Gov Chapter 9: Political Parties Test Answers

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Which supporter of federalism warned people
about the dangers of political parties?
a. John Adams
b. Alexander Hamilton
c. James Madison
d. George Washington
d. George Washington
Which of the following was not a third-party
challenger?
a. Whig Party
b. Progressive Party
c. Dixiecrats
d. Green Party
a. Whig Party
Why were the early U.S. political parties
formed?
Early parties were electoral coalitions of elites, mostly in the U.S. Congress. They were mostly designed to help win House elections and the presidency, but they quickly expanded activities to the state level.
In which type of electoral system do voters
select the party of their choice rather than an
individual candidate?
a. proportional representation
b. first-past-the-post
c. plurality voting
d. majoritarian voting
a. proportional representation
Which of the following does not represent a
major contributing factor in party realignment?
a. demographic shifts
b. changes in key issues
c. changes in party strategies
d. third parties
d. third parties
What impact, if any, do third parties typically have on U.S. elections?
Third parties bring important issues to the attention of the major parties. They also often serve as spoilers in the elections they enter.
Which level of party organization is most
responsible for helping the party’s nominee win
the presidency?
a. precinct
b. county
c. state
d. national
d. national
What techniques led the Democratic Party to
national prominence in the 1830s through 1850s?
The democratic party worked hard to build grassroots organizations and maximize the turnout of voters. They also use patronage to grow in popularity.
In what ways do political parties collude with
state and local government to prevent the rise of
new parties?
Election laws make it harder to get on the ballot and the Electoral College makes it harder for third parties to earn votes.
How do members of the party organization
differ from party identifiers? What role does each
play in the party as a whole?
The party organization are active members in supporting party behavior and candidates, party identifiers are mostly citizens and voters who identify with the party.
What are the positives and negatives of partisan polarization?
Positive: Provides voters with distinct choices
Negative: Moderates aren’t voting or participating in government and it amplifies inter-party conflict.
Why is winning votes so important to political parties? How does the need to win elections affect party structures?
Parties can’t influence and enact policy without winning. They must organize at each level at which elections take place in order to contest elections and develop candidates.
What is the sorting thesis, and what does it suggest as the cause of party polarization?
The sorting thesis says that voters change party allegiances in response to shifts in party position. It suggests that polarization is a function of voters’ paying more attention to national politics and voting more consistently
How have the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street Movement affected partisan politics?
They have pulled their respective parties further to the ideological poles and have changed the issues parties consider. They may also have made compromise more difficult.
bipatisanship
a process of cooperation through compromise
critical election
an election that represents a sudden, clear, and long-term shift in voter allegiances
divided government
a condition in which one or more houses of the legislature is controlled by the party
in opposition to the executive
first-past-the-post
a system in which the winner of an election is the candidate who wins the greatest
number of votes cast, also known as plurality voting
gerrymandering
the manipulation of legislative districts in an attempt to favor a particular candidate
majoritarian voting
a type of election in which the winning candidate must receive at least 50 percent of
the votes, even if a run-off election is required
majority party
the legislative party with over half the seats in a legislative body, and thus significant
power to control the agenda
minority party
the legislative party with less than half the seats in a legislative body
moderate
an individual who falls in the middle of the ideological spectrum
party identifiers
individuals who represent themselves in public as being part of a party
party organization
the formal structure of the political party and the active members responsible for
coordinating party behavior and supporting party candidates
party platform
the collection of a party’s positions on issues it considers politically important
party polarization
the shift of party positions from moderate towards ideological extremes
party realignment
a shifting of party alliances within the electorate
party-in-government
party identifiers who have been elected to office and are responsible for fulfilling
the party’s promises
party-in-the-electorate
members of the voting public who consider themselves part of a political party or
who consistently prefer the candidates of one party over the other
personal politics
a political style that focuses on building direct relationships with voters rather than on
promoting specific issues
plurality voting
the election rule by which the candidate with the most votes wins, regardless of vote
share
political machine
an organization that secures votes for a party’s candidates or supports the party in
other ways, usually in exchange for political favors such as a job in government
political parties
organizations made up of groups of people with similar interests that try to directly
influence public policy through their members who seek and hold public office
precinct
the lowest level of party organization, usually organized around neighborhoods
proportional representation
a party-based election rule in which the number of seats a party receives is a
function of the share of votes it receives in an election
reapportionment
the reallocation of House seats between the states to account for population changes
redistricting
the redrawing of electoral maps
safe seat
a district drawn so members of a party can be assured of winning by a comfortable margin
sorting
the process in which voters change party allegiances in response to shifts in party position
third parties
political parties formed as an alternative to the Republican and Democratic parties, also
known as minor parties
two-party system
a system in which two major parties win all or almost all elections
Which supporter of federalism warned people about the dangers of political parties?
a.John Adams
b.Alexander Hamilton
c.James Madison
d.George Washington
d.George Washington
Which of the following was not a third-party challenger?
a.Whig Party
b.Progressive Party
c.Dixiecrats
d.Green Party
a.Whig Party
In which type of electoral system do voters select the party of their choice rather than an individual candidate?
A.proportional representation
B.first-past-the-post
C.plurality voting
D.majoritarian voting
A.proportional representation
Which of the following does not represent a major contributing factor in party realignment?
A.demographic shifts
B.changes in key issues
C.changes in party strategies
D.third parties
B.changes in key issues
Which level of party organization is most responsible for helping the party’s nominee win the presidency?
A.precinct
B.county
C.state
D.national
D.national

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