AHIP Final Exam Test Answers 2022/2023 Medicare

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Mr. Davis is 52 years old and has recently been diagnosed with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and will soon begin dialysis. He is wondering if he can obtain coverage under Medicare. What should you tell him?
He may sign-up for Medicare at any time however coverage usually begins on the fourth month after dialysis treatments start.
 
Juan Perez, who is turning age 65 next month, intends to work for several more years at Smallcap, Incorporated. Smallcap has a workforce of15 employees and offers employer-sponsored healthcare coverage. Juan is a naturalized citizen and has contributed to the Medicare system for over 20 years. Juan asks you if he will be entitled to Medicare and if he enrolls how that will impact his employer-sponsored healthcare coverage. How would you respond?
Juan is likely to be eligible for Medicare once he turns age 65 and if he enrolls Medicare would become the primary payor of his healthcare claims and Smallcap does not have to continue to offer him coverage comparable to those under age 65 under its employer-sponsored group health plan.
 
Mr. Moy’s wife has a Medicare Advantage plan, but he wants to understand what coverage Medicare Supplemental Insurance provides since his health care needs are different from his wife’s needs. What could you tell Mr. Moy?
Medicare Supplemental Insurance would help cover his Part A and Part B deductibles or coinsurance in Original Fee-for-Service (FFS) Medicare as well as possibly some services that Medicare does not cover.
 
Mrs. Peňa is 66 years old, has coverage under an employer plan, and will retire next year. She heard she must enroll in Part B at the beginning of the year to ensure no gap in coverage. What can you tell her?
She may enroll at any time while she is covered under her employer plan, but she will have a special eight-month enrollment period after the last month on her employer plan that differs from the standard general enrollment period, during which she may enroll in Medicare Part B.
 
Mrs. Chen will be 65 soon, has been a citizen for twelve years, has been employed full time, and paid taxes during that entire period. She is concerned that she will not qualify for coverage under part A because she was not born in the United States. What should you tell her?
Most individuals who are citizens and age 65 or over are covered under Part A by virtue of having paid Medicare taxes while working, though some may be covered as a result of paying monthly premiums.
 
Mrs. Gonzalez is enrolled in Original Medicare and has a Medigap policy as well, but it provides no drug coverage. She would like to keep the coverage she has but replace her existing Medigap plan with one that provides drug coverage. What should you tell her?
Mrs. Gonzalez cannot purchase a Medigap plan that covers drugs, but she could keep her Medigap policy and enroll in a Part D prescription drug plan.
 
Mrs. West wears glasses and dentures and has enjoyed considerable pain relief from arthritis through massage therapy. She is concerned about whether or not Medicare will cover these items and services. What should you tell her?
Medicare does not cover massage therapy, or, in general, glasses or dentures.
 
Mr. Patel is in good health and is preparing a budget in anticipation of his retirement when he turns 66. He wants to understand the health care costs he might be exposed to under Medicare if he were to require hospitalization as a result of an illness. In general terms, what could you tell him about his costs for inpatient hospital services under Original Medicare?
Under Original Medicare, there is a single deductible amount due for the first 60 days of any inpatient hospital stay, after which it converts into a per-day coinsurance amount through day 90. After day 90, he would pay a daily amount up to 60 days over his lifetime, after which he would be responsible for all costs.
 
Ms. Henderson believes that she will qualify for Medicare Coverage when she turns 65, without paying any premiums, because she has been working for 40 years and paying Medicare taxes. What should you tell her?
To obtain Part B coverage, she must pay a standard monthly premium, though it is higher for individuals with higher incomes.
 
Mr. Alonso receives some help paying for his two generic prescription drugs from his employer’s retiree coverage, but he wants to compare it to a Part D prescription drug plan. He asks you what costs he would generally expect to encounter when enrolling into a standard MedicarePart D prescription drug plan. What should you tell him?
He generally would pay a monthly premium, annual deductible, and per-prescription cost-sharing.
 
Ms. Moore plans to retire when she turns 65 in a few months. She is in excellent health and will have considerable income when she retires. She is concerned that her income will make it impossible for her to qualify for Medicare. What could you tell her to address her concern?
Medicare is a program for people age 65 or older and those under age 65 with certain disabilities, end-stage renal disease, and Lou Gehrig’s disease so she will be eligible for Medicare.
 
Mr. Xi will soon turn age 65 and has come to you for advice as to what services are provided under Original Medicare. What should you tell Mr. Xi that best describes the health coverage provided to Medicare beneficiaries?
Beneficiaries under Original Medicare have no cost-sharing for most preventive services which include immunizations such as annual flu shots.
 
Mrs. Duarte is enrolled in Original Medicare Parts A and B. She has recently reviewed her Medicare Summary Notice (MSN) and disagrees with a determination that partially denied one of her claims for services. What advice would you give her?
Mrs. Duarte should file an appeal of this initial determination within 120 days of the date she received the MSN in the mail.
 
Mr. Capadona would like to purchase a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan and a Medigap plan to pick up costs not covered by that plan. What should you tell him?
It is illegal for you to sell Mr. Capadona a Medigap plan if he is enrolled in an MA plan, and besides, Medigap only works with Original Medicare.
 
Mrs. Park is an elderly retiree. Mrs. Park has a low fixed income. What could you tell Mrs. Park that might be of assistance?
She should contact her state Medicaid agency to see if she qualifies for one of several programs that can help with Medicare costs for which she is responsible.
 
Mr. Rainey is experiencing paranoid delusions and his physician feels that he should be hospitalized. What should you tell Mr. Rainey (or his representative) about the length of an inpatient psychiatric hospital stay that Medicare will cover?
Medicare will cover a total of 190 days of inpatient psychiatric care during Mr. Rainey’s entire lifetime.
 
Mr. Schmidt would like to plan for retirement and has asked you what is covered under Original Fee-for-Service (FFS) Medicare? What could you tell him?
Part A, which covers hospital, skilled nursing facility, hospice, and home health services and Part B, which covers professional services such as those provided by a doctor are covered under Original Medicare.
 
Agent John Miller is meeting with Jerry Smith, a new prospect. Jerry is currently enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B. Jerry has also purchased a Medicare Supplement (Medigap) plan which he has had for several years. However, the plan does not provide drug benefits. How would you advise Agent John Miller to proceed?
Tell prospect Jerry Smith that he should consider adding a standalone Part D prescription drug coverage policy to his present coverage.
 
Mr. Bauer is 49 years old, but eighteen months ago he was declared disabled by the Social Security Administration and has been receiving disability payments. He is wondering whether he can obtain coverage under Medicare. What should you tell him?
After receiving such disability payments for 24 months, he will be automatically enrolled in Medicare, regardless of age.
 
Mr. Buck has several family members who died from different cancers. He wants to know if Medicare covers cancer screening. What should you tell him?
Medicare covers the periodic performance of a range of screening tests that are meant to provide early detection of disease. Mr. Buck will need to check specific tests before obtaining them to see if they will be covered.
 
Which of the following statement is/are correct about a Medicare Savings Account (MSA) Plans? I. MSAs may have either a partial network, full network, or no network of providers. II. MSA plans cover Part A and Part B benefits but not Part D prescription drug benefits. III. An individual who is enrolled in an MSA plan is responsible for a minimal deductible of $500 indexed for inflation. IV. Non-network providers must accept the same amount that Original Medicare would pay them as payment in full.
I, II, and IV only
 
Mr. Lombardi is interested in a Medicare Advantage (MA) PPO plan that you represent. It is one of three plans operated by the same organization in Mr. Lombardi’s area. The MA PPO plan does not include drug coverage, but the other two plans do. Mr. Lombardi likes the PPO plan that does not include drug coverage and intends to obtain his drug coverage through a stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan. What should you tell him about this situation?
He could enroll either in one of the MA plans that include prescription drug coverage or Original Medicare with a Medigap plan and standalone Part D prescription drug coverage, but he cannot enroll in the MA-only PPO plan and a stand-alone prescription drug plan.
 
Mrs. Ramos is considering a Medicare Advantage PPO and has questions about which providers she can go to for her health care. What should you tell her?
Mrs. Ramos can obtain care from any provider who participates in Original Medicare, but generally will have a higher cost-sharing amount if she sees a provider who/that is not a part of the PPO network.
 
Mr. Romero is 64, retiring soon, and considering enrollment in his employer-sponsored retiree group health plan that includes drug coverage with nominal copays. He heard about a neighbor’s MA-PD plan that you represent and because he takes numerous prescription drugs, he is considering signing up for it. What should you tell him?
He should compare the benefits in his employer-sponsored retiree group health plan with the benefits in his neighbor’s MA-PD plan to determine which one will provide sufficient coverage for his prescription needs.
 
Dr. Elizabeth Brennan does not contract with the ABC PFFS plan but accepts the plan’s terms and conditions for payment. Mary Rodgers sees Dr. Brennan for treatment. How much may Dr. Brennan charge?
Dr. Brennan can charge Mary Rogers no more than the cost sharing specified in the PFFS plan’s terms and condition of payment which may include balance billing up to 15% of the Medicare rate.
 
Mr. Gomez notes that a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan available in his area has an attractive premium. He wants to know if he must use doctors in a network as his current HMO plan requires him to do. What should you tell him?
He may receive health care services from any doctor allowed to bill Medicare, as long as he shows the doctor the plan’s identification card and the doctor agrees to accept the PFFS plan’s payment terms and conditions, which could include balance billing.
 
Mr. Wells is trying to understand the difference between Original Medicare and Medicare Advantage. What would be the correct description?
Medicare Advantage is a way of covering all the Original Medicare benefits through private health insurance companies.
 
Mrs. Chi is age 75 and enjoys a comfortable but not extremely high-income level. She wishes to enroll in a MA MSA plan that she heard about from her neighbor. She also wants to have prescription drug coverage since her doctor recently prescribed several expensive medications. Currently, she is enrolled in Original Medicare and a standalone Part D plan. How would you advise Mrs. Chi?
Mrs. Chi may enroll in a MA MSA plan and remain in her current standalone Part D prescription drug plan.
 
Daniel is a middle-income Medicare beneficiary. He has chronic bronchitis, putting him at severe risk for pneumonia. Otherwise, he has no problems functioning. Which type of SNP is likely to be most appropriate for him?
. C-SNP
 
Mrs. Burton is a retiree with substantial income. She is enrolled in an MA-PD plan and was disappointed with the service she received from her primary care physician because she was told she would have to wait five weeks to get an appointment when she was feeling ill. She called you to ask what she could do so she would not have to put up with such poor access to care. What could you tell her?
She could file a grievance with her plan to complain about the lack of timeliness in getting an appointment.
 
Mr. Greco is in excellent health, lives in his own home, and has a sizeable income from his investments. He has a friend enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Special Needs Plan (SNP). His friend has mentioned that the SNP charges very low cost-sharing amounts and Mr. Greco would like to join that plan. What should you tell him?
SNPs limit enrollment to certain subpopulations of beneficiaries. Given his current situation, he is unlikely to qualify and would not be able to enroll in the SNP.
 
Mrs. Radford asks whether there are any special eligibility requirements for Medicare Advantage. What should you tell her?
Mrs. Radford must be entitled to Part A and enrolled in Part B to enroll in Medicare Advantage.
 
Mrs. Andrews asked how a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan might affect her access to services since she receives some assistance for her health care costs from the State. What should you tell her?
Medicaid may provide additional benefits, but Medicaid will coordinate benefits only with Medicaid participating providers.
 
Mr. Castillo, a naturalized citizen, previously enrolled in Medicare Part B but has recently stopped paying his Part B premium. Mr. Castillo is still covered by Part A. He would like to enroll in a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan and is still covered by Part A. What should you tell him?
He is not eligible to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan until he re-enrolls in Medicare Part B.
 
Mrs. Davenport enrolled in the ABC Medicare Advantage (MA) plan several years ago. In mid-February of 2021, her doctor confirms a diagnosis of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). What options will Mrs. Davenport have regarding her MA plan during the next open enrollment season?
She may remain in her ABC MA plan, enroll in another MA plan in her service area, or enroll in a Special Needs Plan (SNP) for individuals suffering from ESRD if one is available in her area.
 
Mr. Kumar is considering a Medicare Advantage HMO and has questions about his ability to access providers. What should you tell him?
In most Medicare Advantage HMOs, Mr. Kumar must generally obtain his services only from providers within the plan’s network (except in an emergency or where care is unavailable within the network).ur clients, Lauren Nichols, has heard about a Medica
 
Mr. Barker enjoys a comfortable retirement income. He recently had surgery and expected that he would have certain services and items covered by the plan with minimal out-of-pocket costs because his MA-PD coverage has been very good. However, when he received the bill, he was surprised to see large charges in excess of his maximum out-of-pocket limit that included some services and items he thought would be fully covered. He called you to ask what he could do? What could you tell him?
You can offer to review the plans appeal process to help him ask the plan to review the coverage decision.
 
Mr. Sinclair has diabetes and heart trouble and is generally satisfied with the care he has received under Original Medicare, but he would like to know more about Medicare Advantage Special Needs Plans (SNPs). What could you tell him?
SNPs have special programs for enrollees with chronic conditions, like Mr. Sinclair, and they provide prescription drug coverage that could be very helpful as well.
 
Mr. Lopez has heard that he can sign up for a product called “Medicare Advantage” but is not sure about what type of plan designs are available through this program. What should you tell him about the types of health plans that are available through the Medicare Advantage program?
They are Medicare health plans such as HMOs, PPOs, PFFS, and MSAs.
 
Mr. Sanchez has just turned 65 and is entitled to Part A but has not enrolled in Part B because he has coverage through an employer plan. If he wants to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan, what will he have to do?
He will have to enroll in Part B.
 
Mr. Zachow has a condition for which three drugs are available. He has tried two but had an allergic reaction to them. Only the third drug works for him and it is not on his Part D plan’s formulary. What could you tell him to do?
Mr. Zachow has a right to request a formulary exception to obtain coverage for his Part D drug. He or his physician could obtain the standardized request form on the plan’s website, fill it out, and submit it to his plan.
 
Mr. Bickford did not quite qualify for the extra help low-income subsidy under the Medicare Part D Prescription Drug program and he is wondering if there is any other option he has for obtaining help with his considerable drug costs. What should you tell him?
He could check with the manufacturers of his medications to see if they offer an assistance program to help people with limited means to obtain the medications they need. Alternatively, he could check to see whether his state has a pharmacy assistance program to help him with his expenses.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn both take a specialized multivitamin prescription each day. Mr. Vaughn takes a prescription for helping to regrow his hair. They are anxious to have their Medicare prescription drug plan cover these drug needs. What should you tell them?
Medicare prescription drug plans are not permitted to cover the prescription medications the Vaughns are interested in under Part D coverage, however, plans may cover them as supplemental benefits and the Vaughn’s could look into that possibility.
 
Mr. Wingate is a newly enrolled Medicare Part D beneficiary and one of your clients. In addition to drugs on his plan’s formulary he takes several other medications. These include a prescription drug not on his plan’s formulary, over-the-counter medications for colds and allergies, vitamins, and drugs from an Internet-based Canadian pharmacy to promote hair growth and reduce joint swelling. His neighbor recently told him about a concept called TrOOP and he asks you if any of his other medications could count toward TrOOP should he ever reach the Part D catastrophic limit. What should you say?
None of the costs of Mr. Wingate’s other medications would currently count toward TrOOP but he may wish to ask his plan for an exception to cover the prescription not on its formulary.
 
Ms. Edwards is enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan that includes prescription drug plan (PDP) coverage. She is traveling and wishes to fill two of the prescriptions that she has lost. How would you advise her?
She may fill prescriptions for covered drugs at non-network pharmacies, but likely at a higher cost than paid at an in-network pharmacy.
 
Mrs. Lopez is enrolled in a cost plan for her Medicare benefits. She has recently lost creditable coverage previously available through her husband’s employer. She is interested in enrolling in a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan (PDP). What should you tell her?
If a Part D benefit is offered through her plan she may choose to enroll in that plan or a standalone PDP.
 
Mrs. Allen has a rare condition for which two different brand name drugs are the only available treatment. She is concerned that since no generic prescription drug is available and these drugs are very high cost, she will not be able to find a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan that covers either one of them. What should you tell her?
Medicare prescription drug plans are required to cover drugs in each therapeutic category. She should be able to enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan that covers the medications she needs.
 
Mrs. Quinn has just turned 65, is in excellent health and has a relatively high income. She uses no medications and sees no reason to spend money on a Medicare prescription drug plan if she does not need the coverage. She currently does not have creditable coverage. What could you tell her about the implications of such a decision?
If she does not sign up for a Medicare prescription drug plan as soon as she is eligible to do so, and if she does sign up at a later date, her premium will be permanently increased by 1% of the national average premium for every month that she was not covered.
 
Mr. Shultz was still working when he first qualified for Medicare. At that time, he had employer group coverage that was creditable. During his initial Part D eligibility period, he decided not to enroll because he was satisfied with his drug coverage. It is now a year later and Mr. Shultz has lost his employer group coverage within the last two weeks. How would you advise him?
Mr. Schultz should enroll in a Part D plan before he has a 63-day break in coverage in order to avoid a premium penalty.
 
Mrs. Mulcahy, age 65, is concerned that she may not qualify for enrollment in a Medicare prescription drug plan because, although she is entitled to Part A, she is not enrolled under Medicare Part B. What should you tell her?
An individual who is entitled to Part A or enrolled under Part B is eligible to enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan. As long as Mrs. Mulcahy is entitled to Part A, she does not need to enroll under Part B before enrolling in a prescription drug plan.
 
What types of tools can Medicare Part D prescription drug plans use that affect the way their enrollees can access medications?
Part D plans do not have to cover all medications. As a result, their formularies, or lists of covered drugs, will vary from plan to plan. In addition, they can use cost containment techniques such as tiered co-payments and prior authorization.
 
All plans must cover at least the standard Part D coverage or its actuarial equivalent. Which of the following statements best describes some of the costs a beneficiary would incur for prescription drugs under the standard coverage?
Standard Part D coverage would require payment of an annual deductible, and once past the catastrophic coverage threshold, the beneficiary pays whichever is greater of either the co-pays for generic and brand name drugs or coinsurance of 5%.
 
Mr. Jacob understands that there is a standard Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit, but when he looks at information on various plans available in his area, he sees a wide range in what they charge for deductibles, premiums, and cost sharing. How can you explain this to him?
Medicare Part D drug plans may have different benefit structures, but on average, they must all be at least as good as the standard model established by the government.
 
Mr. Carlini has heard that Medicare prescription drug plans are only offered through private companies under a program known as Medicare Advantage (MA), not by the government. He likes Original Medicare and does not want to sign up for an MA product, but he also wants prescription drug coverage. What should you tell him?
Mr. Carlini can stay with Original Medicare and also enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan through a private company that has contracted with the government to provide only such drug coverage to eligible Medicare beneficiaries.
 
Which of the following individuals is most likely to be eligible to enroll in a Part D Plan?
Jose, a grandfather who was granted asylum and has worked in the United States for many years.
 
Mr. Hutchinson has drug coverage through his former employer’s retiree plan. He is concerned about the Part D premium penalty if he does not enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan, but does not want to purchase extra coverage that he will not need. What should you tell him?
If the drug coverage he has is not expected to pay, on average, at least as much as Medicare’s standard Part D coverage expects to pay, then he will need to enroll in Medicare Part D during his initial eligibility period to avoid the late enrollment penalty.
 
Mrs. McIntire is enrolled in her state’s Medicaid plan and has just become eligible for Medicare as well. What can she expect will happen to her drug coverage?
Unless she chooses a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan on her own, she will be automatically enrolled in one available in her area.
 
Mrs. Berkowitz wants to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan that does not include drug coverage and also enroll in a stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan. Under what circumstances can she do this?
If the Medicare Advantage plan is a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan that does not offer drug coverage or a Medical Savings Account plan, Mrs. Berkowitz can do this.
 
Which of the following statements about Medicare Part D are correct? I. Part D plans must enroll any eligible beneficiary who applies regardless of health status except in limited circumstances. II. Private fee-for-service (PFFS) plans are not required to use a pharmacy network but may choose to have one. III. Beneficiaries enrolled in a MA-Medical Savings Account (MSA) plan may only obtain Part D benefits through a standalone PDP. IV. Beneficiaries enrolled in a MA-PPO may obtain Part D benefits through a standalone PDP or through their plan.
I, II, and III only
 
Mr. Torres has a small savings account. He would like to pay for his monthly Part D premiums with an automatic monthly withdrawal from his savings account until it is exhausted, and then have his premiums withheld from his Social Security check. What should you tell him?
In general, he must select a single Part D premium payment mechanism that will be used throughout the year.
 
You will be holding a sales event soon, at which you would like to offer door prizes to attendees. Under guidelines from the Medicare agency, what types of gifts or prizes would not be allowed in this situation?
Gift cards or gift certificates of $15 or less that can be readily converted to cash.
 
Another agent working for your agency claims that because you are not employed by the Medicare Advantage plans that you represent, you are not subject to the same marketing requirements as the plans themselves. How should you respond to such a statement?
Your coworker is not correct. Marketing on behalf of a plan is considered marketing by the plan and requires that all contracted and employed agents comply with all Medicare marketing rules.
 
Mrs. Lu is turning 65 in November and called to ask for your help deciding on a Medicare Advantage plan. She agreed to sign a scope of appointment form and meet with you on October 15. During the appointment, what are you permitted to do?
You may provide her with the required enrollment materials and take her completed enrollment application.
 
One of your colleagues argues that it is better to focus your time and energy exclusively in neighborhoods with single-family homes. He further argues that their older owners are more likely to have higher incomes and purchase the Medicare Advantage products you represent compared to those living in apartment complexes. How should you respond?
This could be considered discriminatory activity and a prohibited practice.
 
A Medicare beneficiary has walked into your office and requested that you sit down with her and discuss her options under the Medicare Advantage program. Before engaging in such a discussion, what should you do?
You must have her sign a scope of appointment form, indicating which products she wishes to discuss. You may then proceed with the discussion.
 
Your friend’s mother just moved to an assisted living facility and he asked if you could present a program for the residents about the MA-PD plans you market. What could you tell him?
You appreciate the opportunity and would be happy to schedule an appointment with anyone at their request.
 
Melissa Meadows is a marketing representative for Best Care which has recently introduced a Medicare Advantage plan offering comprehensive dental benefits for $15 per month. Best Care has not submitted any potential posts to CMS for approval. Melissa would like to use the power of social media to reach potential prospects. What advice would you give her?
As soon as CMS approves Best Care’s social media posts, Agent Meadows could post a tweet stating that “Best Care offers an array of Medicare Advantage benefit packages. One might be right for you. Call me to find out more!”
 
Agent Jennings makes a presentation on Medicare advertised as an educational event. Agent Jennings distributes materials that are solely educational. However, she gives a brief presentation that mentions plan-specific premiums. Is this a prohibited activity at an event that has been advertised as educational?
Yes. When an event has been advertised as “educational,” discussing plan-specific premiums is impermissible.
 
Agent Martinez wishes to solicit Medicare Advantage prospects through e-mail and asks you for advice as to whether this is possible. What should you tell her?
Marketing representatives may initiate electronic contact through e-mail but an opt-out process must be provided.
 
Miguel Sanchez is a relatively new agent who has come to you for advice as to what he can do during the Medicare Advantage Open Enrollment Period (MA-OEP). What advice should you give Miguel?
During the MA-OEP, Miguel can have one-on-one meetings with beneficiaries who have requested such meetings.
 
ABC is a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan sponsor. It would like to use its enrollees’ information to market non-health related products such as life insurance and annuities. Which statement best describes ABC’s obligation to its enrollees regarding marketing such products?
It must obtain a HIPAA complaint authorization from an enrollee that indicates the plan or plan sponsor may use their information for marketing purposes.
 
You have approached a hospital administrator about marketing in her facility. The administrator is uncomfortable with the suggestion. How could you address her concerns?
Tell her that Medicare guidelines allow you to conduct marketing activities in common areas of a provider’s facility.
 
During a sales presentation, your client asks you whether the Medicare agency recommends that she sign up for your plan or stay in Original Medicare. What should you tell her?
Tell her that the Medicare agency does not endorse or recommend any plan.
 
Agent Armstrong is employed by XYZ Agency, which is under contract with ABC Health Plan, a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan that offers plans in multiple states. XYZ Agency maintains a website marketing the MA plans with which it has contracts. Agent Armstrong follows up with individuals who request more information about ABC MA plans via the website and tries to persuade them to enroll in ABC plans. What statement best describes the marketing and compliance rules that apply to Agent Armstrong?
Agent Armstrong needs to be licensed and appointed in every state in which beneficiaries to whom he markets ABC MA plans are located.
 
You have been providing a pre-Thanksgiving meal during sales presentations in November for many years and your clients look forward to attending this annual event. When marketing Medicare Advantage and Part D plans, what are you permitted to do with respect to meals?
You may provide light snacks, but a Thanksgiving style meal would be prohibited, regardless of who provides or pays for the meal.
 
Next week you will be participating in your first “educational event” for prospective enrollees. To be sure that you do not violate any of the applicable guidelines, in what activities should you plan to engage?
You should plan to ensure that the educational event is an informative event and must not conduct a sales presentation or distribute or accept enrollment forms at the event.
 
You are working several plans and community organizations to sponsor an educational event. When putting together advertisements for this event, what should you do?
You must ensure that the advertisements indicate it is an educational event, otherwise it will be considered a marketing event.
 
Another agent you know has engaged in misconduct that has been verified by the plan she represented. What sort of penalty might the plan impose on this individual?
The plan may withhold commission, require retraining, report the misconduct to a state department of insurance or terminate the contract.
 
You are seeking to represent an individual Medicare Advantage plan and an individual Part D plan in your state. You have completed the required training for each plan, but you did not achieve a passing score on the tests that came after the training. What can you do in this situation?
You will not be able to represent any Medicare Advantage or Part D plan until you complete the training and achieve an adequate score. However, you will not have to take a test if you exclusively market employer/union group plans and the companies do not require testing.
 
Plan sponsors may undertake the following marketing activities with current Medicare Advantage plan members?
Market non-health related items or services such as life insurance or annuities policies to current members as permitted following HIPAA Privacy Rules.
 
Mr. Rockwell, age 67, is enrolled in Medicare Part A, but because he continues to work and is covered by an employer health plan, he has not enrolled in Part B or Part D. He receives a notice on June 1 that his employer is cutting back on prescription drug benefits and that as of July 1 his coverage will no longer be creditable. He has come to you for advice. What advice would you give Mr. Rockwell about special election periods (SEPs)?
Mr. Rockwell is eligible for a SEP due to his involuntary loss of creditable drug coverage; the SEP begins in June and ends on September 1- two months after the loss of creditable coverage.
 
Mrs. Young is currently enrolled in Original Medicare (Parts A and B), but she has been working with Agent Neil Adams in the selection of a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan. It is mid-September, and Mrs. Young is going on vacation. Agent Adams is considering suggesting that he and Mrs. Young complete the application together before she leaves. He will then submit the paper application before the start of the annual enrollment period (AEP). What would you say If you were advising Agent Adams?
This is a bad idea. Agents are generally prohibited from soliciting or accepting an enrollment form before the start of the AEP.
 
Mr. Block is currently enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan that includes drug coverage. He found a stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan in his area that offers better coverage than that available through his MA-PD plan and in addition, has a low premium. It won’t cost him much more and, because he has the means to do so, he wishes to enroll in the stand-alone prescription drug plan in addition to his MA-PD plan. What should you tell him?
If Mr. Block enrolls in the stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan, he will be disenrolled from the Medicare Advantage plan.
 
Mrs. Reeves is newly eligible to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan and her MA Initial Coverage Election Period (ICEP) has just begun. Which of the following can she not do during the ICEP?
She can enroll in a Medigap plan to supplement the benefits of the MA plan that she’s also enrolling in.
 
Mr. Johannsen is entitled to Medicare Part A and Part B. He gains the Part D low-income subsidy. How does that affect his ability to enroll or disenroll in a Part D plan?
He qualifies for a special election period and can enroll in or disenroll from a Part D plan once during that period.
 
Mr. Yoo’s employer has recently dropped comprehensive creditable prescription drug coverage that was offered to company retirees. The company told Mr. Yoo that, because he was affected by this change, he would qualify for a Special election period. Mr. Yoo contacted you to find out more about what this means. What can you tell him?
It means that he qualifies for a one-time opportunity to enroll in an MA-PD or Part D prescription drug plan.
 
Mrs. Schmidt is moving and a friend told her she might qualify for a “Special election period” to enroll in a new Medicare Advantage plan. She contacted you to ask what a special election period is. What could you tell her?
It is a period, outside of the Annual Election Period, when a Medicare beneficiary can select a new or different Medicare Advantage and/or Part D prescription drug plan. Typically the Special election period is beneficiary specific and results from events, such as when the beneficiary moves outside of the service area.
 
Mrs. Margolis contacts you in August because she will become eligible for Medicare for the first time in November. She would like to meet and discuss plan choices with you. What advice should you give her?
Tell her to wait until October to discuss plan choices with you so that you can share plan benefits for the current year as well as any changes for the following year that may impact her choice.
 
Mr. Chen is enrolled in his employer’s group health plan and will be retiring soon. He would like to know his options since he has decided to drop his retiree coverage and is eligible for Medicare. What should you tell him?
Mr. Chen can disenroll from his employer-sponsored coverage to elect a Medicare Advantage or Part D plan within 2 months of his disenrollment.
 
Mrs. Kumar would like her daughter, who lives in another state, to meet with you during the Annual Election Period to help her complete her enrollment in a Part D plan. She asked you when she should have her daughter plan to visit. What could you tell her?
Her daughter should come in November.
 
Mr. Roberts is enrolled in an MA plan. He recently suffered complications following hip replacement surgery. As a result, he has spent the last three months in Resthaven, a skilled nursing facility. Mr. Roberts is about to be discharged. What advice would you give him regarding his health coverage options?
His open enrollment period as an institutionalized individual will continue for two months after the month he moves out of the facility.
 
Mr. White has Medicare Parts A and B with a Part D plan. Last year, he received a notice that his plan sponsor identified him as a “potential at-risk” beneficiary. This month, he started receiving assistance from Medicaid. He wants to find a different Part D plan that’s more suitable to his current prescription drug needs. He believes he’s entitled to a SEP since he is now a dual eligible. Is he able to change to a different Part D plan during a SEP for dual eligible individuals?
No. Once he is identified by the plan sponsor as a “potential at-risk” beneficiary, he cannot use the dual eligible SEP to change plans while this designation is in place.
 
Mr. Ziegler is turning 65 next month and has asked you what he can do, and when he must do it, with respect to enrolling in Part D. What could you tell him?
He is currently in the Part D Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) and, during this time, he may make one Part D enrollment choice, including enrollment in a stand-alone Part D plan or an MA-PD plan.
 
A client wants to give you an enrollment application on October 1 before the beginning of the Annual Election Period because he is leaving on vacation for two weeks and does not want to forget about turning it in. What should you tell him?
You must tell him you are not permitted to take the form. If he sends the form directly to the plan, the plan will process the enrollment on the day the Annual Election Period begins.
 
Mr. Garrett has just entered his MA Initial Coverage Election Period (ICEP). What action could you help him take during this time?
He will have one opportunity to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan.
 
You are meeting with Ms. Berlin and she has completed an enrollment form for a MA-PD plan you represent. You notice that her handwriting is illegible and as a result, the spelling of her street looks incorrect. She asks you to fill in the corrected street name. What should you do?
You may correct this information as long as you add your initials and date next to the correction.
 
You have come to Mrs. Midler’s home for a sales presentation. At the beginning of the presentation, Mrs. Midler tells you that she has a copy of her medical records available because she thinks this will help you understand her needs. She suggests that you will know which questions to ask her about her health status in order to best assist her in selecting a plan. What should you do?
You can only ask Mrs. Midler questions about conditions that affect eligibility, specifically, whether she has one of the conditions that would qualify her for a special needs plan.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Nunez attended one of your sales presentations. They’ve asked you to come to their home to clear up a few questions. During the presentation, Mrs. Nunez feels tired and tells you that her husband can finish things up. She goes to bed. At the end of your discussion, Mr. Nunez says that he wants to enroll both himself and his wife. What should you do?
As long as she can do so, only Mrs. Nunez can sign her enrollment form. Mrs. Nunez will have to wake up to sign her form or do so at another time.
 
When Myra first became eligible for Medicare, she enrolled in Original Medicare (Parts A and B). She is now 67 and will turn 68 on July 1. She would now like to enroll in a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan and approaches you about her options. What advice would you give her?
She should remain in Original Medicare until the annual election period running from October 15 to December 7, during which she can select an MA plan.
 
Mr. Wendt suffers from diabetes which has gotten progressively worse during the last year. He is currently enrolled in Original Medicare (Parts A and B) and a Part D prescription drug plan and did not enroll in a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan during the last annual open enrollment period (AEP) which has just closed. Mr. Wendt has heard certain MA plans might provide him with more specialized coverage for his diabetes and wants to know if he must wait until the next annual open enrollment period (AEP) before enrolling in such a plan. What should you tell him?
If there is a special needs plan (SNP) in Mr. Wendt’s area that specializes in caring for individuals with diabetes, he may enroll in the SNP at any time under a special election period (SEP)
 
Since 2004 Ms. Eisenberg has had a Medigap plan that provides some drug coverage. She has recently received a letter from her Medigap carrier informing her that her drug coverage is not “creditable.” She wants to know what this means. What should you tell her?
The letter is to inform her that the drug coverage offered through her Medigap plan does not offer drug coverage that is at least comparable to that provided under the Medicare Part D prescription drug program. If she does not have such creditable coverage during periods when she is first eligible for the Part D program, she will face a premium penalty if she enrolls in a Part D plan at a later date.
 
Mr. Cole has been a Medicaid beneficiary for some time, and recently qualified for Medicare as well. He is concerned about changes in his cost-sharing. What should you tell him?
He should know that Medicaid will pay cost sharing only for services provided by Medicaid participating providers.
 
Mrs. Wu was primarily a homemaker and employed in jobs that provided taxable income only sporadically. Her husband worked full-time throughout his long career. She has heard that to qualify for Medicare Part A she has to have worked and paid Medicare taxes for a sufficient time. What should you tell her?
Since her husband paid Medicare taxes during the entire time he was working, she will automatically qualify for Medicare Part A without having to pay any premiums.
 
A Medicare beneficiary has walked into your office and requested that you sit down with her and discuss her options under the Medicare Advantage program. Before engaging in such a discussion, what should you do?
You must have her sign a scope of appointment form, indicating which products she wishes to discuss. You may then proceed with the discussion.
 
Mr. Perry is entitled to Medicare Part A but has not yet enrolled in Part B, even though he is 69 years old. He would like to enroll in a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan but is concerned that he will have to sign up for Part B as well in order to qualify for enrollment in a Part D plan. What should you tell him?
He does not have to enroll in Part B but, must pay a penalty for his failure to do so when he first turned 65. After that, he can enroll in a Part D prescription drug plan.
 
Mr. Nguyen understands that Medicare prescription drug plans can use a formulary or list of covered drugs. He is suspicious about how plans establish these formularies. What should you tell him?
Formularies must be developed with input from pharmacists, doctors, and other experts.
 
ACA Section 1557 rules for disability concern
Policies and procedures, physical access, and communication.
 
Under ACA Section 1557, a health plan premium sold through a state exchange may, based on an individual’s age,
charge higher premiums.
 
Which of the following statements best describes Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA)?
Section 1557 incorporates earlier civil rights protections in regard to race, color, national origin, disability, age and sex.
 
Which Medicare programs are covered by ACA Section 1557?
Parts A, C, and D, but not B.
 
As a result of violations of ACA Section 1557 nondiscrimination rules,
a health plan may revoke an agent or broker’s appointment with the health plan.
 
Which of the following statements best describes the scope of operations subject to Section 1557 under the 2020 Final Rule?
Health insurers under the 2020 Final Rule are not considered to be principally engaged in delivering health care, and thus lines of business that do not receive federal funding or administered under Title I of the ACA, such as life insurance, do not fall under the scope of 1557.
 
Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act applies to
all health programs and activities administered by or receiving federal financial assistance from HHS
 
Under Section 1557, 2020 Final Rule issued during the Trump Administration sex was initially defined____________
as biologic sex only, meaning whether a person was determined to be male or female at birth.
 
Which of the following would be considered permissible under Section 1557 and the 2020 Final Rule?
Broker Mary Jones has recruited a diverse workforce. She encourages her agents to prospect through community-based marketing and within their community of influence.
 
Auxiliary aids and services must be provided to individuals with disabilities, such as those suffering from vision or hearing impairments, free of charge, and in a timely manner. Auxiliary aids and services include which of the following: I. large print materials II. qualified sign language interpreters III. braille materials and displays IV. screen reader software
I, II, III, and IV
 
Which entity enforces Section 1557 for programs that receive funding from on are administered by HHS?
The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) of HHS.
 
Which of these actions is most likely to be permitted in dealing with a person with limited English proficiency?
Allowing a child to interpret in an emergency.
 
Under ACA Section 1557, a health plan
cannot deny coverage to LEP individuals and is required to provide language assistance to them, free of charge.
 
For a health plan, what are the possible consequences of violations of ACA Section 1557?
Loss of federal business and compensatory damages.
 
Which of the following is NOT potentially a penalty for violation of a law or regulation prohibiting fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA)?
Deportation
 
Which of the following requires intent to obtain payment and the knowledge the actions are wrong?
Fraud
 
You are performing a regular inventory of the controlled substances in the pharmacy. You discover a minor inventory discrepancy. What should you do?
Follow your pharmacy’s procedures
 
Your job is to submit a risk diagnosis to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) for the purpose of payment. As part of this job, you use a process to verify the data is accurate. Your immediate supervisor tells you to ignore the Sponsor’s process and to adjust or add risk diagnosis codes for certain individuals. What should you do?
Report the incident to the compliance department (via compliance hotline or other mechanism)
 
You are in charge of paying claims submitted by providers. You notice a certain diagnostic provider (“Doe Diagnostics”) requested a substantial payment for a large number of members. Many of these claims are for a certain procedure. You review the same type of procedure for other diagnostic providers and realize Doe Diagnostics’ claims far exceed any other provider you reviewed. What should you do?
Consult with your immediate supervisor for next steps or contact the compliance department (via compliance hotline, Special Investigations Unit [SIU], or other mechanism)
 
A person drops off a prescription for a beneficiary who is a “regular” customer. The prescription is for a controlled substance with a quantity of 160. This beneficiary normally receives a quantity of 60, not 160. You review the prescription and have concerns about possible forgery. What is your next step?
Call the prescriber to verify the quantity
 
Waste includes any misuse of resources, such as the overuse of services or other practices that directly or indirectly result in unnecessary costs to the Medicare Program.
True
 
Bribes or kickbacks of any kind for services that are paid under a Federal health care program (which includes Medicare) constitute fraud by the person making as well as the person receiving them.
True
 
These are examples of issues that should be reported to a Compliance Department: suspected fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA); potential health privacy violation, unethical behavior, and employee misconduct.
True
 
Abuse involves payment for items or services when there is no legal entitlement to that payment and the provider has not knowingly or intentionally misrepresented facts to obtain payment.
True
 
Ways to report potential fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA) include: a. Mail drops b. Special Investigative Units (SIUs) c. Tekephone hotlines d. All of the above e. In-person reporting to the compliance department/supervisor
All of the above
 
Once a corrective action plan is started, the corrective action plan must be monitored annually to ensure they are effective.
False
 
What are some of the penalties for violating fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA) laws? a.Civil Monetary Penalties b.Imprisonment c.All of the above d.Exclusion from participation in all Federal health care programs
All of the above
 
Any person who knowingly submits false claims to the Government is liable for five times the Government’s damages caused by the violator plus a penalty.
False
 
Some of the laws governing Medicare Part C and D fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA) include the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the False Claims Act the Anti-Kickback Statute, and the Health Care Fraud Statute.
False
 
You can help prevent fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA) by doing all the following: Look for suspicious activity Conduct yourself in an ethical manner Ensure accurate and timely data and billing Ensure you coordinate with other payers Keep up to date with FWA policies and procedures, standards of conduct, laws, regulations, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) guidance Verify all information provided to you
True
 
You are performing a regular inventory of the controlled substances in the pharmacy. You discover a minor inventory discrepancy. What should you do?
Follow your pharmacy’s procedures
 
You work for a Sponsor. Last month, while reviewing a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) monthly report, you identified multiple individuals not enrolled in the plan but for whom the Sponsor is paid. You spoke to your supervisor who said don’t worry about it. This month, you identify the same enrollees on the report again. What should you do?
Although you know about the Sponsor’s non-retaliation policy, you are still nervous about reporting—to be safe, you submit a report through your compliance department’s anonymous tip line to avoid identification
 
You discover an unattended email address or fax machine in your office receiving beneficiary appeals requests. You suspect no one is processing the appeals. What should you do?
Contact your compliance department (via compliance hotline or other mechanism)
 
A sales agent, employed by the Sponsor’s first-tier, downstream, or related entity (FDR), submitted an application for processing and requested two things: 1) to back-date the enrollment date by one month, and 2) to waive all monthly premiums for the beneficiary. What should you do?
Process the application properly (without the requested revisions)—inform your supervisor and the compliance officer about the sales agent’s request
 
Ways to report a compliance issue include: a.In-person reporting to the compliance department/supervisor b.Report on the Sponsor’s website c.Telephone hotlines d.All of the above
All of the above
 
Compliance is the responsibility of the Compliance Officer, Compliance Committee, and Upper Management only.
False
 
What is the policy of non-retaliation?
Protects employees, who in good faith report suspected non-compliance
 
Medicare Parts C and D sponsors are not required to have a compliance program.
False
 
At a minimum, an effective compliance program includes four core requirements.
False
 
Correcting non-compliance________
Protects enrollees, avoids recurrence of same non-compliance, and promotes efficiency
 
These are examples of issues that can be reported to a Compliance Department: suspected fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA), potential health privacy violation, and unethical behavior/employee misconduct.
True
 
Once a corrective action plan begins addressing non-compliance for fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA) committed by a Sponsor’s employee or first-tier, downstream, or related entity’s (FDR’s) employee, ongoing monitoring of the corrective actions is not necessary.
False
 
Standards of Conduct are the same for every Medicare Parts C and D sponsor.
False
 
What are some of the consequences for non-compliance, fraudulent, or unethical behavior? a.Exclusion from participating kin all Federal health care programs b.Termination of employment c.Disciplinary action d.All of the above
All of the above
 
Ms. Levi is considering enrollment in a Medicare Advantage HMO plan offered in her area. Ms. Levi often travels to visit relatives and is concerned that she may need emergency care outside of her plan’s service area. What should you tell her about coverage of emergency care?
Plans are required to cover out-of-network emergency care.
 
Ms. Morris will turn 65 on June 10th. She has never previously qualified for Medicare. She is entitled to Medicare Part A and intends to enroll in Part B. She wants to know if she is eligible to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan that includes prescription drug coverage. What do you tell her?
Ms. Morris can enroll in an MA-PD plan now since her initial election period (IEP) for Part D prescription drug coverage and initial coverage period are occurring together beginning March 1st and ending September 30th.
 
Agent Marvin Millner wants to reach out to his current clients for referrals. What advice would you give to Marvin?
Marvin should understand that under CMS guidelines he can no longer provide gifts, even of minimal value, in exchange for referrals. NOT SURE
 
Mr. Chen has heard about a Medical Savings Account (MSA) but wants to know if it is just about saving money, or if he will get insurance coverage for his health care expenditures as well. What should you tell him?
Under the Medicare Advantage program, a MSA plan involves the combination of a high deductible health plan and a savings account for health expenses. Medicare will make contributions to this savings account to help him pay his health care expenses while in the deductible. NOT SURE
 
Ms. Lewis understands that Medicare prescription drug plans may use various methods to control the use of specific drugs. She has heard about a technique called “step therapy” and is wondering if you can explain what that is. What should you tell her?
Step therapy involves using one or more lower priced drugs before trying a more expensive drug when all are used to treat the same condition.
 
Ms. Stuart has heard about a special needs plan (SNP) that one of her friends is enrolled in and is interested in that product. She wants to be sure she also has coverage for prescription drugs. Would she be able to obtain drug coverage if she enrolled in the SNP?
Yes. All SNPs are required to provide Part D coverage for prescription drugs.
 
Agent Roderick enrolls retiree Mrs. Martinez in a medical savings account (MSA) Medicare health plan. The MSA plan does not offer prescription drug coverage, so Agent Roderick also enrolls Mrs. Martinez in a standalone prescription drug plan (PDP). What CMS compensation rules apply to this situation?
This situation is considered a “dual enrollment,” and CMS compensation rules are applied to the two plans at once and independently of each other.
 
Mr. Olsen is concerned that a Medicare Advantage plan will not cover the same range of services that would be covered under Original fee-for-service Medicare. What should you tell him?
Though their cost-sharing may differ from Original Medicare’s, Medicare Advantage plans are required to cover all services covered by original Medicare.
 
Mrs. Wellington is enrolled in Parts A and B of Original Medicare. A friend recently told her that there is an excellent Medicare Advantage (MA) plan with a five-star rating serving her area. On January 15 she comes to you for advice as to what options, if any, she has. What should you say regarding special enrollment periods (SEPs)?
Mrs. Wellington is eligible for a SEP that may be used once until November 30 to enroll in the five-star plan.
 
Ms. Gardner is currently enrolled in an MA-PD plan. However, she wants to disenroll from the MA-PD plan and instead enroll in a Part D only plan and go back to Original Medicare. According to Medicare’s enrollment guidelines, when could she do this?
She may make such a change during the Annual Election Period that runs from Oct. 15 to December 7, or during the MA Open Enrollment Period which takes place from January 1- March 31 of each year.
 
Mr. Lopez, who is fairly well-off financially, would like to enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan you represent and simply give you a check to cover his premiums for the entire year. What should you tell him?
Enrollees should pay using automatic withdrawal from a bank account or credit or debit card, direct monthly billing from the plan, or deductions from their Social Security check.
 
Ms. Jensen has heard about “Original Fee-for-Service Medicare” and “Private Fee-for-Service” plans. She wants to know what the difference is if any. What should you tell her?
PFFS plans are a type of Medicare Advantage plan offered by private companies.
 
Ms. Bushman has two homes in different states and is concerned about restrictions on where she can get her medications. What should you tell her?
Part D prescription drug plans use networks of pharmacies within their service areas. She could look for a plan that maintains a network in both states. NOT SURE
 
Who is most likely to be eligible to enroll in a Part D prescription drug plan?
Ms. Davis who is entitled to Part A and has just enrolled in Part B.a sales presentation, your client asks you wh
 
Mr. Lopez takes several high-cost prescription drugs. He would like to enroll in a standalone Part D prescription drug plan that is available in his area. In what type of Medicare Health Plan can he enroll?
Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan that does not include drug coverage.
 
If a beneficiary is enrolled in a stand-alone prescription drug plan and wants to keep that plan, what type of Medicare health plan could the individual also enroll in, without being automatically disenrolled from the stand-alone prescription drug plan?
The beneficiary could enroll in a private fee-for-service (PFFS) plan that does not include prescription drug coverage; a cost plan; or a Medicare Medical Savings Account (MSA) plan.
 
Mr. Moreno invited his neighbor, Agent Tom Smith, to discuss Medicare Advantage (MA) and Part D plans that Agent Smith sells at the regular Tuesday brunch the neighbors have for senior citizens. What should Agent Tom Smith tell Mr. Moreno about the kinds of food that can be provided to potential enrollees who attend the sales presentation?
A meal cannot be provided, but light snacks would be permitted
 
Which of the following is/are most likely to be characterized as an involuntary disenrollment from a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan? I. The enrollee dies. II. An SNP enrollee loses special needs status due to substantially improved health. III. It is determined that the member is not lawfully present in the United States. IV. The member enrolls in another plan during the Annual Open Enrollment period.
I, II, and III only
 
Mr. Singh would like drug coverage but does not want to be enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan. What should you tell him
Mr. Singh can enroll in a stand-alone prescription drug plan and continue to be covered for Part A and Part B services through Original Fee-for-Service Medicare.
 
Madeline Martinez was widowed several years ago. Her husband worked for many years and contributed into the Medicare system. He also left a substantial estate which provides Madeline with an annual income of approximately $130,000. Madeline, who has only worked part-time for the last three years, will soon turn age 65 and hopes to enroll in Original Medicare. She comes to you for advice. What should you tell her?
You should tell Madeline that she will be able to enroll in Medicare Part A without paying monthly premiums due to her husband’s long work record and participation in the Medicare system. You should also tell Madeline that she will pay Part B premiums at more than the standard lowest rate but less than the highest rate due her substantial income.
 
Mr. Wu is eligible for Medicare. He has limited financial resources but failed to qualify for the Part D low-income subsidy. Where might he turn for help with his prescription drug costs?
Mr. Wu may still qualify for help in paying Part D costs through his State Pharmaceutical Assistance Program.
 
Mrs. Geisler’s neighbor told her she should look at her Part D options during the annual Medicare enrollment period because features of Part D might have changed. Mrs. Geisler can’t remember what Part D is so she called you to ask what her neighbor was talking about. What could you tell her?
Part D covers prescription drugs and she should look at her premiums, formulary, and cost-sharing among other factors to see if they have changed.
 
Mr. Diaz continued working with his company and was insured under his employer’s group plan until he reached age 68. He has heard that there is a premium penalty for those who did not sign up for Part B when first eligible and wants to know how much he will have to pay. What should you tell him?
Mr. Diaz will not pay any penalty because he had continuous coverage under his employer’s plan.
 
Mrs. Paterson is concerned about the deductibles and co-payments associated with Original Medicare. What can you tell her about Medigap as an option to address this concern?
Medigap plans help beneficiaries cover Original Medicare benefits, but they coordinate with Original Medicare coverage.
 
Mrs. Turner is comparing her employer’s retiree insurance to Original Medicare and would like to know which of the following services Original Medicare will cover if the appropriate criteria are met? What could you tell her?
Original Medicare covers ambulance services.
 
Anita Magri will turn age 65 in August 2022. Anita intends to enroll in Original Medicare Part A and Part B. She would also like to enroll in a Medicare Supplement (Medigap) plan. Anita’s older neighbor Mel has told her about the Medigap Part F plan in which he is enrolled. It not only provides foreign travel emergency benefits but also covers his Medicare Part B deductible. Anita comes to you for advice. What should you tell her?
You are sorry to disappoint Anita but a Medigap Part F plan is no longer available to those who turn age 65 after January 1,2020. Anita might instead consider other Medigap plans that offer foreign travel benefits but do not cover the Part B deductible.
 
Mrs. Quinn recently turned 66 and decided after many years of work to begin receiving Social Security benefits. Shortly thereafter Mrs. Quinn received a letter informing her that she has been automatically enrolled in Medicare Part B. She wants to understand what this means. What should you tell Mrs. Quinn?
Part B primarily covers physician services. She will be paying a monthly premium and, with the exception of many preventive and screening tests, generally will have 20% coinsurance for these services, in addition to an annual deductible.
 
What impact, if any, have recent regulatory changes had upon Medigap plans?
The Part B deductible is no longer covered for individuals newly eligible for Medicare starting January 1, 2020.
 
Mrs. Shields is covered by Original Medicare. She sustained a hip fracture and is being successfully treated for that condition. However, she and her physicians feel that after her lengthy hospital stay she will need a month or two of nursing and rehabilitative care. What should you tell them about Original Medicare’s coverage of care in a skilled nursing facility?
Medicare will cover Mrs. Shield’s skilled nursing services provided during the first 20 days of her stay, after which she would have a copay until she has been in the facility for 100 days.
 
Mrs. Willard wants to know generally how the benefits under Original Medicare might compare to the benefits package of a Medicare Advantage Plan before she starts looking at specific plans. What could you tell her?
Medicare Advantage Plans may offer extra benefits that Original Medicare does not offer such as vision, hearing, and dental services and must include a maximum out-of-pocket limit on Part A and Part B services.
 
Mrs. Andrews asked how a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan might affect her access to services since she receives some assistance for her health care costs from the State. What should you tell her?
Medicaid may provide additional benefits, but Medicaid will only pay for these services if they are furnished by Medicaid participating providers.
 
Mrs. Walters is enrolled in her state’s Medicaid program in addition to Medicare. What should she be aware of when considering enrollment in a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan?
She can submit any bills she has for co-payments under Medicare to the state’s Medicaid program and they will always be fully covered.
 
Mrs. Kelly, age 65, is entitled to Part A but has not yet enrolled in Part B. She is considering enrollment in a Medicare Advantage plan (Part C). What should you advise her to do before she will be able to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan?
To join a Medicare Advantage plan, she also must enroll in Part B.
 
Ms. Gibson recently lost her employer group health and drug coverage and now she wants to enroll in a PPO that does not include drug coverage. What should you tell her about obtaining drug coverage?
She can enroll in the PPO, but she will not be able to purchase a stand-alone Medicare Part D prescription drug plan.
 
Mrs. Chou likes a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan available in her area that does not include drug coverage. She wants to enroll in the plan and enroll in a stand-alone prescription drug plan. What should you tell her?
She could enroll in a PFFS plan and a stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan.
 
Mrs. Lyons is in good health, uses a single prescription, and lives independently in her own home. She is attracted by the idea of maintaining control over a Medical Savings Account (MSA) but is not sure if the plan associated with the account will fit her needs. What specific piece of information about a Medicare MSA plan would it be important for her to know, prior to enrolling in such a plan?
All MSAs cover Part A and Part B benefits, but not Part D prescription drug benefits, which could be obtained by also enrolling in a separate prescription drug plan.
 
Mrs. Fiore is a retired federal worker with coverage under a Federal Employee Health Benefits (FEHB) plan that includes creditable drug coverage. She is ready to turn 65 and become Medicare eligible for the first time. What issues might she consider about whether to enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan?
She could compare the coverage to see if the Medicare Part D plan offers better benefits and coverage than the FEHB plan for the specific medications she needs and whether any additional benefits are worth the Part D premium costs on top of her FEHB contribution.
 
Mrs. Roswell is a new Medicare beneficiary who has just retired from retail work. She is interested in selecting a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan. She takes a number of medications and is concerned that she has not been able to identify a plan that covers all of her medications. She does not want to make an abrupt change to new drugs that would be covered and asks what she should do. What should you tell her?
Every Part D drug plan is required to cover a single one-month fill of her existing medications sometime during a 90-day transition period.
 
Mrs. Roberts has Original Medicare and would like to enroll in a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan. All types of PFFS plans are available in her area. Which options could Mrs. Roberts consider before selecting a PFFS plan?
A Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug (MA-PD) PFFS plan that combines medical benefits and Part D prescription drug coverage, a PFFS plan offering only medical benefits, or a PFFS plan in combination with a stand-alone prescription drug plan.
 
Mrs. Walters is entitled to Part A and has medical coverage without drug coverage through an employer retiree plan. She is not enrolled in Part B. Since the employer plan does not cover prescription drugs, she wants to enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan. Will she be able to?
Yes. Mrs. Walters must be entitled to Part A and/or enrolled in Part B to be eligible for coverage under the Medicare prescription drug program.
 
Mrs. Fields wants to know whether applying for the Part D low-income subsidy will be worth the time to fill out the paperwork. What could you tell her?
The Part D low-income subsidy could substantially lower her overall costs. She can apply by contacting her state Medicaid office or calling the Social Security Administration.
 
One of your clients, Lauren Nichols, has heard about a Medicare concept from one of her neighbors called TrOOP. She asks you to explain it. What do you say?
TrOOP stands for true out-of-pocket expenses that count toward the Medicare Part D catastrophic limit and include not only expenses paid by a beneficiary but also in some instances drug manufacturer discounts.
 
Mr. Shapiro gets by on a very small amount of fixed income. He has heard there may be extra help paying for Part D prescription drugs for Medicare beneficiaries with limited income. He wants to know whether he might qualify. What should you tell him?
The extra help is available to beneficiaries whose income and assets do not exceed annual limits specified by the government.
 
Mr. Rice is 68, actively working and has coverage for medical services and medications through his employer’s group health plan. He is entitled to premium free Part A and thinking of enrolling in Part B and switching to an MA-PD because he is paying a very large part of his group coverage premium and it does not provide coverage for a number of his medications. Which of the following is NOT a consideration when making the change?
Mr. Rice’s retiree plan is required to take him back if, within 63 days of having voluntarily quit the employer’s plan, he decides that he prefers it to his Medicare Part D plan.
 
This year you have decided to focus your efforts on marketing to employer group plans. One employer provides you with a list of their retirees and asks you to contact them to explain the characteristics of the plan they have selected. What should you do?
You may go ahead and call them.
 
Alice is a marketing representative employed by a health plan. Betty is a captive agent of a health plan who markets to multiple plans and sponsors. Carl is a captive agent who markets to only one plan/sponsor. Denise is an independent agent who markets to different types of groups. Edward is an independent agent who markets only to employer and union groups. CMS marketing representative compensation rules generally apply to:
Betty and Denise, but not Alice (the employee) or Carl or Edward (to whom exceptions apply).
 
During a sales presentation to Ms. Daley for a Medicare Advantage plan that has a 5-star rating in customer service and care coordination, and received an overall plan performance rating of a 4-star, which of the following would be the best statement to say to her?
The Medicare Advantage plan received a 5-star rating in customer service and care coordination with an overall performance rating of 4-stars.
 
BestCare Health Plan has received a request from a state insurance department in connection with the investigation of several marketing representatives licensed by the state who sell Medicare Advantage plans. What action(s) should BestCare take in response?
Cooperate with the state and supply requested information.
 
You are mailing invitations to new Medicare beneficiaries for a marketing event. You want an idea of how many people to expect, so you would like to request RSVPs. What should you keep in mind?
You may request RSVPs, but you are not permitted to require contact information.
 
You market many different types of insurance and ordinarily you spend time each evening calling potential clients. To comply with requirements for marketing Medicare Advantage and Part D plans, what must you do about contacting potential clients to market those plans?
You will have to avoid calling any potential client unless he or she initiates contact with you and specifically asks that you give him or her a call.
 
Monica is an agent focused on serving seniors eligible for Medicare. As she reviews her records, she is trying to determine which of the following items are considered compensation. What do you tell her? I. Commissions II. Bonuses III. Mileage reimbursement IV. Awards
I, II and IV only
 
Your colleague works at a third-party marketing organization (TMO) and she said she did not need to take the Medicare training for brokers and agents or pass a test to market Medicare plans since her contract is with the TMO, not the plans that have the products she sells. What could you say to her?
You could tell her she is wrong, and that only agents selling employer/union group plans are permitted an exemption from testing, but some employer/union group plans may require testing to promote agent compliance with CMS marketing requirements.
 
Mr. Lynn, an agent for Acme Insurance, Inc. thinks that, since state laws are preempted concerning the marketing of Medicare health plans, he doesn’t have much to worry about. What might you, as his colleague, advise him concerning the type of scrutiny he will be under?
Organizations sponsoring Medicare health plans are responsible for the behavior of their contracted representatives and will be conducting monitoring activities to ensure compliance with all applicable federal law and guidance and plan policies. Furthermore, state agent licensure laws are not preempted and he must abide by their requirements.
 
You have set up an appointment for an in-home sales presentation with Mrs. Fernandez, who expressed interest in the Medicare plans you represent. In preparation for the sales presentation, what must you do?
Before conducting the presentation, obtain, and document having obtained her permission to visit, along with her interest in the specific products you will present.
 
You are meeting with Mrs. Hall in her home. On her scope of appointment form, she asked to discuss Medicare Advantage plans. During the meeting, she asks to discuss a stand-alone prescription drug plan. She is leaving the next day to visit her family for a week in another state, so it is important for her to make a decision before she leaves. What must happen before that additional discussion can take place?
Since Mrs. Hall specifically asked that you discuss the stand-alone Part D plan, you may do so, as long as she signs a new scope of appointment form first, indicating that she wants to discuss the Part D plan
 
Agent Harriet Walker has recently begun marketing Medicare Advantage and related products aimed at meeting the needs of senior citizens. Client Mildred Jones has expressed interest in a Medicare Advantage plan. It is now the beginning of September. If you were in Agent Walker’s position, what would you do?
Inquire whether the client qualifies for a special enrollment period, and if not, solicit an enrollment application once the annual open enrollment election period begins on October 15th.
 
You plan to participate in an educational event sponsored by a large regional health care system. One of your colleagues suggests that you do a presentation on one of the Medicare Health plans you market and modify it to include information about preventive screening tests showcased at the event. How should you respond to your colleague’s suggestion?
You should tell your colleague no, because participation in an educational event may not include a sales presentation.
 
By contacting plans available in your area, you have learned that the plan you represent has a significantly lower monthly premium than the others. Furthermore, you see that the plan you represent has a unique benefits package. What should you do to make sure your clients know about these pieces of information?
You may make comparisons between plans if you can support them by studies or statistical data and such comparisons are factually based
 
When you market Medicare Advantage and Part D plans, what may you offer as a gift to induce enrollment in a plan?
You may provide gifts or prizes to all potential enrollees during an event that does not exceed $15 in retail value.
 
You are scheduled to give a sales presentation at a local senior center at which a drawing will be held for a prize. At the beginning of the presentation, which of the following must you do?
Clearly state that no obligation exists to enroll if a gift or prize is being offered.
 
Winthrop Brokerage wishes to place an advertisement in the local newspaper that says: “We offer Medicare Advantage plans offered by AB Health and Top Choice Health. Contact us if you would like to learn more.” Which of the following best describes the obligation(s) of Winthrop Brokerage regarding the advertisement?
Winthrop Brokerage does not need to submit the advertisement to CMS for prior approval because it does not include information about the plans’ benefits structures, cost-sharing, or information about measures or ranking standards.
 
If you are to comply with Medicare’s guidance regarding educational events, which of the following would be acceptable activities?
You may distribute business cards to individuals who request information on how to contact you for further details on the plan(s) you represent.
 
While making an appointment to discuss Medicare Advantage (MA) and Part D plans with a potential enrollee, you are asked to describe other types of insurance products that your client might wish to purchase. What additional types of insurance can you present during the MA and Part D marketing appointment?
You can present only health care related lines of business but must obtain the beneficiary’s permission to do so before the presentation occurs and document that you have obtained that permission.
 
Mr. Edwards, a marketing representative of the ACME Insurance Company, scheduled a marketing event and expects about 40 people to attend. He has hired a magician for $200 to entertain attendees. Can he do this in a way that complies with guidance from the Medicare agency?
He can do this because the estimated number of attendees is based on the venue size and response rate and the value of the gift does not exceed $15.
 
Willard works as a representative focused on the senior marketplace. What would be considered prohibited activity by Willard?
Implying that only seniors can enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan when meeting with Mr. Hernandez, who is 58 but qualifies for Medicare because he is disabled.
 
Which of the following individuals has enrolled in a plan based on a fixed enrollment period?
Ben, who enrolls in a Medicare Advantage plan during the Medicare Advantage Open Enrollment Period (MA OEP).
 
Mr. Wilcox has been enrolled in Lexington Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) Medicare Advantage Health Plan (Lexington) for several years. Recently, Mr. Wilcox decided to spend time with his children who live in another state that is not in Lexington’s service area. In the future, he may relocate near his children permanently. How does this move to another service area impact his PFFS MA coverage?
Lexington can allow for Mr. Wilcox’s continued enrollment for up to 12 months whether or not he is in a visitor/traveler (V/T) program since it is a PFFS plan.
 
Miles is a licensed agent who represents Colgate Health and its Medicare Advantage (MA) plans. Miles has several clients who have recently come to him for help. They are in their initial coverage periods) (ICEP) and are interested in enrolling in one of Colgate Health’s MA plans. Adam will soon turn 68 and has decided to retire. Betty is about to turn 65 and has also decided to retire. Adam and Betty both currently have coverage through Colgate Health. Charles had health coverage through Colgate but dropped the coverage when he retired early to travel to Europe. Charles has just turned age 65 and is now back in the United States. Diedre, who will turn 65 next month, currently has coverage through Ditmas Health – a company that Miles also represents. Who qualifies for the opt-in simplified enrollment mechanism?
Adam and Betty because each of them will not have a break between their non-Medicare and Medicare coverage through Colgate Health Plan.
 
Mr. Fitzgerald is selling his home to permanently move into a retirement facility near his daughter in a neighboring state before the Annual Election Period. He has a stand-alone prescription drug plan and has learned it is not available where he is moving. He doesn’t know what he should do. What can you tell him?
Because he is moving outside of the service area, the plan must automatically disenroll him. He will have a special election period to select a new plan.
 
Mrs. Jenkins is enrolled in both Part A and Part B of Medicare. She has recently also become eligible for Medicaid and would like to enroll in a MA-PD plan. Since this is her first experience with Medicare Advantage, she is concerned that she will be locked into a plan and unable to make any coverage changes for at least a year if not longer. What should you tell her?
Since Mrs. Jenkins has Medicare Part A and Part B and receives Medicaid, she has a special election period (SEP) that will allow her to enroll or disenroll from an MA or MA-PD plan during the first 9 months of each calendar year.
 
Mr. Rodriguez is currently enrolled in a MA plan, but his plan doesn’t sufficiently cover his prescription drug needs. He is interested in changing plans during the upcoming MA Open Enrollment Period. What are his options during the MA OEP?
He can switch to a MA-PD plan.
 
Mrs. Parker likes to handle most of her business matters through telephone calls. She currently is enrolled in Original Medicare Parts A and B but has heard about a Medicare Advantage plan offered by Senior Health from a neighbor. Mrs. Parker asks you whether she can enroll in Senior Health’s MA plan over the telephone. What can tell her? I. Enrollment requests can only be made in face-to-face interviews or by mail. II. Telephone enrollment request calls must be recorded. III. Telephonic enrollments must include all required elements necessary to complete an enrollment. IV. The signature element must be completed via certified mail.
II and III only
 
Mr. Ford enrolled in an MA-only plan in mid-November during the Annual Election Period (AEP). On December 1, he calls you up and says that he has changed his mind and would like to enroll into a MA-PD plan. What enrollment rules would apply in this case?
He can make as many enrollment changes as he likes during the Annual Election Period and the last choice made prior to the end of the period will be the effective one as of January 1.
 
Ms. Thomas has worked for many years and is turning 68 in June. She is eligible for Medicare Part A and did not enroll for Part B when first eligible because she has insurance through her employer – Coffee Brew, Inc. She also did not enroll in Part D because she had creditable coverage. She would like to retire in June and enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan. She has been informed that her group coverage will end on her retirement effective date. How would you advise Ms. Thomas?
Ms. Thomas can enroll in Part B without a late penalty at any time she is still covered by her employer group and 8 months after her last month of employer group coverage without a penalty. However, because she wants to enroll in a MA plan after retirement, she should make sure her Part B coverage is effective in time to use the Medicare Advantage/Part D special election period for individuals changing from employer group coverage to enroll in a MA plan or MA-PD. The SEP begins while she has employer group coverage and will last until 2 months after the month after the month her employer coverage ends. If she wants Part D coverage she should enroll in an MA-PD or a PDP (depending on how she decides to receive her Part A and B benefits) during this time.
 
Mr. Liu turns 65 on June 19. He has never previously qualified for Medicare so his first Medicare eligibility date will be by June 1. Mr. Liu’s ICEP and Part D IEP begin March 1 and end on September 30. He wants prescription drug coverage with his Part A and Part B benefits. What advice can you provide him?
He can enroll in a MA-PD as long as he enrolls in Part B and is entitled to Part A.
 
Ms. Claggett is sixty-six (66) years old. She has been covered under Original Medicare for the last six years due to her disability and has never been enrolled in a Medicare Advantage or a Part D plan before. She wants to enroll in a Part D plan. She knows that there is such a thing as the “Part D Initial Enrollment Period” (IEP) and has concluded that, since she has never enrolled in such a plan before, she should be eligible to enroll under this period. What should you tell her about how the Part D Initial Enrollment Period applies to her situation?
Ms. Claggett has had two IEPs and missed them both. The first occurred three months before and three months after the month when she was first entitled to Part A OR enrolled in Part B. Because she was eligible for Medicare before age 65, Ms. Claggett had a second IEP based on turning age 65, which has also expired.
 
Ms. O’Donnell learned about a new MA-PD plan that her neighbor suggested and that you represent. She plans to switch from her old MA HMO plan to the new MA-PD plan during the Annual Election Period. However, she wants to make sure she does not end up paying premiums for two plans. What can you tell her?
She only needs to enroll in the new MA-PD plan and she will automatically be disenrolled from her old MA plan.
 
You work for Caring Health, a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan sponsor. Recently, Mrs. Garcia has completed an enrollment application for a plan offered by Caring Health, which is waiting for a reply from CMS indicating whether or not Mrs. Garcia’s enrollment has been accepted. Once CMS replies, how long does Caring Health have to notify Mrs. Garcia that her enrollment has been accepted and in what format?
The plan has 10 calendar days to notify Mrs. Garcia in writing.
 
Mrs. Kendrick is in good health, has worked for many years and is six months away from turning 65. She wants to know what she will have to do to enroll in a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan as soon as possible. What could you tell her?
She may enroll in an MA plan beginning three months immediately before her first entitlement to both Medicare Part A and Part B.
 
Mrs. Reynolds is in her Medicare initial coverage election period (ICEP) and the date of her entitlement to Part A and B has already occurred. Mrs. Reynolds has just signed up for a Medicare Advantage plan on the second of the month. She is leaving for vacation in two weeks and wants to know if her new coverage will start before she leaves. What should you tell her?
Typically, her coverage would begin on the first day of the next month, so she should not expect her coverage to begin before she leaves.
 
Mr. Robinson was quite ill recently and forgot to pay his monthly premium for his MA-PD plan. He is worried that he will lose his coverage now when he needs it the most. He is certain his plan will disenroll him because that is what happened to a friend of his in a similar type of plan. What can you tell Mr. Robinson about his situation?
Plan sponsors have the option to do nothing when a plan member does not pay their premiums or disenroll the member after a grace period and notice.
 
Mrs. Johnson calls to tell you she has not received her new plan ID card yet, but she needs to see a doctor. What can she expect to receive from the plan after the plan has received her enrollment form?
Evidence of plan membership, information on how to obtain services, and the effective date of coverage.
 
Mr. Anderson is a very organized individual and has filled out and brought to you an enrollment form on October 10 for a new plan available January 1 next year. He is currently enrolled in Original Medicare. What should you do?
Tell Mr. Anderson that you cannot accept any enrollment forms until the annual election period begins.
 
Richard is a licensed agent who represents Spartan Health Plan and its Medicare Advantage (MA) plans. Richard has several clients who have recently come to him for help who are in their initial coverage election period (ICEP) and are interested in enrolling in one of Spartan Health Plan’s MA plans. Alice will soon turn 65 and retire. Alice has coverage through Spartan Health Plan offered by her employer. Bob had health coverage through Spartan but dropped the coverage when he retired early to travel overseas. Bob, who has just turned age 65, is now back in the United States. Charlotte, who will turn 65 next month, has coverage through Athena Health plan – a company Richard also represents. Who qualifies for the opt-in simplified enrollment mechanism?
Alice because she will not have a break between her non-Medicare and Medicare coverage through Spartan Health Plan. ???????????????
 
You would like to offer gifts of nominal value to potential enrollees who call for more information about a plan you represent. You would then like to offer additional gifts if they come to a marketing event. Each of the gifts meets the CMS definition of nominal value, but together, the gifts are more than the nominal value. Is this permissible?
No, the total value of the gifts given to an enrollee in a year cannot exceed the CMS definition of nominal value.
 
You are doing a sales presentation for Ms. Duarte and her son. Ms. Duarte has some cognitive impairment and her son informs you that he has power of attorney to only make financial not health care decisions for her. Can he execute the enrollment for her?
No, he cannot execute the enrollment for her. He must have a legal authorization, under state law that explicitly allows him to make health care decisions for his mother.
 
Agent Willis had several clients who disenrolled from the plans he represents during the AEP to enroll in Medicare Advantage plans that are competitors of his. Agent Willis believes that the choices they made are not ideal for them and would like to get their business back during the Medicare Advantage Open Enrollment Period (MA-OEP). What can agent Willis do?
He can call them to let them know that if they do not like their new plans, they can change back during the MA-OEP.
 
During a sales presentation in Ms. Sullivan’s home, she tells you that she has heard about a type of Medicare health plan known as Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS). She wants to know if this would be available to her. What should you tell her about PFFS plans?
A PFFS plan is one of the various types of Medicare Advantage plans offered by private entities and she may enroll in one if it is available in her area.
 
Mrs. Sanchez lives in a state located near Canada. She has recently become eligible for Medicare and is considering enrollment in Part D prescription drug coverage. One of her friends has told her that she needs to be aware of something called TrOOP. What should you tell her when she asks you about TrOOP?
TrOOP are out-of-pocket costs that count toward the annual out-of-pocket threshold to move into catastrophic coverage and generally include the annual deductible(s) and costs for drugs on the plan’s formulary purchased at a plan’s participating pharmacy. In some instances, amounts not directly paid by the enrollee (like manufacturer discounts) count toward TrOOP.
 
Mr. Polanski likes the cost of an HMO plan available in his area but would like to be able to visit one or two doctors who aren’t participating providers. He wants to know if the Point of Service (POS) option available with some HMOs will be of any help in this situation. What should you tell him?
The POS option might be a good solution for him as it will allow him to visit out-of-network providers, generally without prior approval. However, he should be aware that it is likely he will have to pay higher cost-sharing for services from out-of-network providers.
 
Mr. Landry is approaching his 65th birthday. He has signed up for Medicare Part A, but he did not enroll in Part B because he has employer-sponsored coverage and intends to keep working for several more years. But he is considering enrolling in Part D prescription drug coverage because he believes it is superior to his employer plan. How would you advise him?
Mr. Landry is eligible for Part D since he has Part A, and his initial enrollment period (IEP) for Part D will continue for three months after his 65th birthday.
 
You have decided to focus on doing in-home presentations to market the Medicare Advantage (MA) plans you represent. Before you conduct such sales presentations, what must you do?
You must receive an invitation from the beneficiary and document the specific types of products the beneficiary wants to discuss prior to making an in-home presentation.
 
This year you decide to focus your efforts on marketing to employer and union groups. Which of the following statements best describes what you can and cannot do in order to stay in compliance?
You are not required to submit communication and marketing materials specific only to those employer plans to CMS at the time of use, but CMS may request and review copies if employee complaints occur.
 
Agent Chan is conducting a sales presentation on senior issues where he hopes to enroll some attendees in the Medicare Advantage (MA) plans he represents. What action(s) may Agent Chan take during the event?
Discuss plan specific information such as premiums and benefits.
 
Ms. Hernandez has marketed several different types of insurance products in her home state and has typically sought approval of her materials from her State Department of Insurance. What would you advise her regarding seeking such approval for materials she uses to market Medicare Advantage plans?
Materials need only be reviewed and approved by the company(s) she represents.
 
Mrs. Duarte is enrolled in Original Medicare Parts A and B. She has recently reviewed her Medicare Summary Notice (MSN) and disagrees with a determination that partially denied one of her claims for services. What advice would you give her?
Mrs. Duarte should file an appeal of this initial determination within 120 days of the date she received the MSN in the mail.
 
Mr. Davis is 52 years old and has recently been diagnosed with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and will soon begin dialysis. He is wondering if he can obtain coverage under Medicare. What should you tell him?
He may sign-up for Medicare at any time however coverage usually begins on the fourth month after dialysis treatments start.
 
Juan Perez, who is turning age 65 next month, intends to work for several more years at Smallcap, Incorporated. Smallcap has a workforce of 15 employees and offers employer-sponsored healthcare coverage. Juan is a naturalized citizen and has contributed to the Medicare system for over 20 years. Juan asks you if he will be entitled to Medicare and if he enrolls how that will impact his employer-sponsored healthcare coverage. How would you respond? a. Juan is likely to be ineligible for Medicare since he was born outside the United States and has only contributed to the Medicare system for 20 years. b. Juan is likely to be eligible for Medicare once he turns age 65 and if he enrolls Medicare would become the primary payor of his healthcare claims and Smallcap does not have to continue to offer him coverage comparable to those under age 65 under its employer-sponsored group health plan. c. Juan is likely to be eligible for Medicare once he turns age 65 and if he enrolls his employer-sponsored coverage would continue to be the primary payor while Medicare would be considered a secondary payor of his healthcare claims. d. Juan is likely to be eligible for Medicare once he turns age 65 and if he enrolls Medicare would become the primary payor of his healthcare claims but Smallcap must continue to offer him coverage under its employer-sponsored group health plan and would become a secondary payor.
b. Juan is likely to be eligible for Medicare once he turns age 65 and if he enrolls Medicare would become the primary payor of his healthcare claims and Smallcap does not have to continue to offer him coverage comparable to those under age 65 under its employer-sponsored group health plan. Correct: Medicare is the primary payor for individuals who have group health coverage as a result of their or their spouse’s employment with a company that is not a large group health plan (GHP) (basically, one with fewer than 20 employees). Furthermore, small GHPs do not have to continue to offer their age 65 and over employees and their spouses the same benefits under the GHP as individuals under age 65.
 
Ms. Thomas has worked for many years and is turning 68 in june. she is eligible for medicare part a and did not enroll for part b when first eligible because she has insurance through her employer – coffee brew, inc. she also did not enroll in part d because she had creditable coverage. she would like to retire in june and enroll in a medicare advantage plan. she has been informed that her group coverage will end on her retirement effective date. how would you advise ms. thomas?
b. Ms. Thomas should enroll in Part B which would enable her to use the SEP for individuals changing from employer group coverage to enroll in a MA plan or MA-PD. The SEP will last until 3 months after the month her employer coverage ends.
 
Juan Perez, who is turning age 65 next month, intends to work for several more years at Smallcap, Incorporated. Smallcap has a workforce of15 employees and offers employer-sponsored healthcare coverage. Juan is a naturalized citizen and has contributed to the Medicare system for over 20 years. Juan asks you if he will be entitled to Medicare and if he enrolls how that will impact his employer-sponsored healthcare coverage. How would you respond?
Juan is likely to be eligible for Medicare once he turns age 65 and if he enrolls Medicare would become the primary payor of his healthcare claims and Smallcap does not have to continue to offer him coverage comparable to those under age 65 under its employer-sponsored group health plan.
 
Mr. Moy’s wife has a Medicare Advantage plan, but he wants to understand what coverage Medicare Supplemental Insurance provides since his health care needs are different from his wife’s needs. What could you tell Mr. Moy?
Medicare Supplemental Insurance would help cover his Part A and Part B deductibles or coinsurance in Original Fee-for-Service (FFS) Medicare as well as possibly some services that Medicare does not cover.
 
Mrs. Peňa is 66 years old, has coverage under an employer plan, and will retire next year. She heard she must enroll in Part B at the beginning of the year to ensure no gap in coverage. What can you tell her?
She may enroll at any time while she is covered under her employer plan, but she will have a special eight-month enrollment period after the last month on her employer plan that differs from the standard general enrollment period, during which she may enroll in Medicare Part B.
 
Mrs. Chen will be 65 soon, has been a citizen for twelve years, has been employed full time, and paid taxes during that entire period. She is concerned that she will not qualify for coverage under part A because she was not born in the United States. What should you tell her?
Most individuals who are citizens and age 65 or over are covered under Part A by virtue of having paid Medicare taxes while working, though some may be covered as a result of paying monthly premiums.
 
Mrs. Gonzalez is enrolled in Original Medicare and has a Medigap policy as well, but it provides no drug coverage. She would like to keep the coverage she has but replace her existing Medigap plan with one that provides drug coverage. What should you tell her?
Mrs. Gonzalez cannot purchase a Medigap plan that covers drugs, but she could keep her Medigap policy and enroll in a Part D prescription drug plan.
 
Mrs. West wears glasses and dentures and has enjoyed considerable pain relief from arthritis through massage therapy. She is concerned about whether or not Medicare will cover these items and services. What should you tell her?
Medicare does not cover massage therapy, or, in general, glasses or dentures.
 
Mr. Patel is in good health and is preparing a budget in anticipation of his retirement when he turns 66. He wants to understand the health care costs he might be exposed to under Medicare if he were to require hospitalization as a result of an illness. In general terms, what could you tell him about his costs for inpatient hospital services
under Original Medicare?
Under Original Medicare, there is a single deductible amount due for the first 60 days of any inpatient hospital stay, after which it converts into a per-day coinsurance amount through day 90. After day 90, he would pay a daily amount up to 60 days over his lifetime, after which he would be responsible for all costs.
 
Dr. Elizabeth Brennan does not contract with the ABC PFFS plan but accepts the plan’s terms and conditions for payment. Mary Rodgers sees Dr. Brennan for treatment. How much may Dr. Brennan charge?
Dr. Brennan can charge Mary Rogers no more than the cost sharing specified in the PFFS plan’s terms and condition of payment which may include balance billing up to 15% of the Medicare rate.
 
Ms. Henderson believes that she will qualify for Medicare Coverage when she turns 65, without paying any premiums, because she has been working for 40 years and paying Medicare taxes. What should you tell her?
To obtain Part B coverage, she must pay a standard monthly premium, though it is higher for individuals with higher incomes.
 
Mr. Alonso receives some help paying for his two generic prescription drugs from his employer’s retiree coverage, but he wants to compare it to a Part D prescription drug plan. He asks you what costs he would generally expect to encounter when enrolling into a standard MedicarePart D prescription drug plan. What should you tell him?
He generally would pay a monthly premium, annual deductible, and per-prescription cost-sharing.
 
Ms. Moore plans to retire when she turns 65 in a few months. She is in excellent health and will have considerable income when she retires. She is concerned that her income will make it impossible for her to qualify for Medicare. What could you tell her to address her concern?
Medicare is a program for people age 65 or older and those under age 65 with certain disabilities, end-stage renal disease, and Lou Gehrig’s disease so she will be eligible for Medicare.
 
Mr. Xi will soon turn age 65 and has come to you for advice as to what services are provided under Original Medicare. What should you tell Mr. Xi that best describes the health coverage provided to Medicare beneficiaries?
Beneficiaries under Original Medicare have no cost-sharing for most preventive services which include immunizations such as annual flu shots.
 
Mrs. Jenkins is enrolled in both part a and part b of medicare. she has recently also become eligible for medicaid and would like to enroll in a ma-pd plan. since this is her first experience with medicare advantage, she is concerned that she will be locked into a plan and unable to make any coverage changes for at least a year if not longer. What should you tell her?
Since Mrs. Jenkins has Medicare Part A and Part B and receives Medicaid, she has a special election period (SEP) that will allow her to enroll or disenroll from an MA or MA-PD plan during the first 9 months of each calendar year.
 
Mr. Patel is in good health and is preparing a budget in anticipation of his retirement when he turns 66. He wants to understand the health care costs he might be exposed to under medicare if he were to require hospitalization as a result of an illness. In general terms, what could you tell him about his costs for inpatient hospital services under original medicare?
d. Under Original Medicare, there is a single deductible amount due for the first 60 days of any inpatient hospital stay, after which it converts into a per-day coinsurance amount through day 90. After day 90, he would pay a daily amount up to 60 days over his lifetime, after which he would be responsible for all costs Correct
 
Mr. Rodriguez is currently enrolled in a ma plan, but his plan doesn’t sufficiently cover his prescription drug needs. He is interested in changing plans during the upcoming ma open enrollment period. What are his options during the ma oep?
He can switch to a MA-PD plan.
 
Mr. Capadona would like to purchase a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan and a Medigap plan to pick up costs not covered by that plan.
What should you tell him?
It is illegal for you to sell Mr. Capadona a Medigap plan if he is enrolled in an MA plan, and besides, Medigap only works with Original Medicare.
 
Mrs. Park is an elderly retiree. Mrs. Park has a low fixed income. What could you tell Mrs. Park that might be of assistance?
She should contact her state Medicaid agency to see if she qualifies for one of several programs that can help with Medicare costs for which she is responsible.
 
Gene got Medicare before he turned 65 and enrolled into a Medicare Advantage plan. He calls in February the month before his 65th birthday and is unhappy with his current plan. On the date of the call, what can Gene do about his coverage?
On the day he called, he can enroll in a different Medicare Advantage plan with an effective date of March 1.
 
Mr. Rainey is experiencing paranoid delusions and his physician feels that he should be hospitalized. What should you tell Mr. Rainey (or his representative) about the length of an inpatient psychiatric hospital stay that Medicare will cover?
Medicare will cover a total of 190 days of inpatient psychiatric care during Mr. Rainey’s entire lifetime.
 
Mr. Rainey is experiencing paranoid delusions and his physician feels that he should be hospitalized. What should you tell Mr. Rainey (or his representative) about the length of an inpatient psychiatric hospital stay that Medicare will cover?
Medicare will cover a total of 190 days of inpatient psychiatric care during Mr. Rainey’s entire lifetime.
 
Mr. Schmidt would like to plan for retirement and has asked you what is covered under Original Fee-for-Service (FFS) Medicare? What could you tell him?
Part A, which covers hospital, skilled nursing facility, hospice, and home health services and Part B, which covers professional services such as those provided by a doctor are covered under Original Medicare.
 
Agent John Miller is meeting with Jerry Smith, a new prospect. Jerry is currently enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B. Jerry has also purchased a Medicare Supplement (Medigap) plan which he has had for several years. However, the plan does not provide drug benefits. How would you advise Agent John Miller to proceed?
Tell prospect Jerry Smith that he should consider adding a standalone Part D prescription drug coverage policy to his present coverage.
 
Mr. Bauer is 49 years old, but eighteen months ago he was declared disabled by the Social Security Administration and has been receiving disability payments. He is wondering whether he can obtain coverage under Medicare. What should you tell him?
After receiving such disability payments for 24 months, he will be automatically enrolled in Medicare, regardless of age.
 
Mr. Buck has several family members who died from different cancers. He wants to know if Medicare covers cancer screening.
What should you tell him?
Medicare covers the periodic performance of a range of screening tests that are meant to provide early detection of disease. Mr. Buck will need to check specific tests before obtaining them to see if they will be covered.
 

Which of the following statement is/are correct about a Medicare Savings Account (MSA) Plans?

I. MSAs may have either a partial network, full network, or no network of providers.
II. MSA plans cover Part A and Part B benefits but not Part D prescription drug benefits.
III. An individual who is enrolled in an MSA plan is responsible for a minimal deductible of $500 indexed for inflation.
IV. Non-network providers must accept the same amount that Original Medicare would pay them as payment in full.

I, II, and IV only
 
Mr. Lombardi is interested in a Medicare Advantage (MA) PPO plan that you represent. It is one of three plans operated by the same organization in Mr. Lombardi’s area. The MA PPO plan does not include drug coverage, but the other two plans do. Mr. Lombardi likes the PPO plan that does not include drug coverage and intends to obtain his drug coverage through a stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan. What should you tell him about this situation?
He could enroll either in one of the MA plans that include prescription drug coverage or Original Medicare with a Medigap plan and standalone Part D prescription drug coverage, but he cannot enroll in the MA-only PPO plan and a stand-alone prescription drug plan.
 
Mrs. Ramos is considering a Medicare Advantage PPO and has questions about which providers she can go to for her health care. What should you tell her?
Mrs. Ramos can obtain care from any provider who participates in Original Medicare, but generally will have a higher cost-sharing amount if she sees a provider who/that is not a part of the PPO network.
 
Mr. Gomez notes that a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan available in his area has an attractive premium. He wants to know if he must use doctors in a network as his current HMO plan requires him to do. What should you tell him?
He may receive health care services from any doctor allowed to bill Medicare, as long as he shows the doctor the plan’s identification card and the doctor agrees to accept the PFFS plan’s payment terms and conditions, which could include balance billing.
 
Mr. Wells is trying to understand the difference between Original Medicare and Medicare Advantage. What would be the correct description?
Medicare Advantage is a way of covering all the Original Medicare benefits through private health insurance companies.
 
Daniel is a middle-income Medicare beneficiary. He has chronic bronchitis, putting him at severe risk for pneumonia. Otherwise, he has no problems functioning. Which type of SNP is likely to be most appropriate for him?
.
C-SNP
 
Mrs. Burton is a retiree with substantial income. She is enrolled in an MA-PD plan and was disappointed with the service she received from her primary care physician because she was told she would have to wait five weeks to get an appointment when she was feeling ill. She called you to ask what she could do so she would not have to put up with such poor access to care. What could you tell her?
She could file a grievance with her plan to complain about the lack of timeliness in getting an appointment.
 
Mr. Greco is in excellent health, lives in his own home, and has a sizeable income from his investments. He has a friend enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Special Needs Plan (SNP). His friend has mentioned that the SNP charges very low cost-sharing amounts and Mr. Greco would like to join that plan. What should you tell him?
SNPs limit enrollment to certain subpopulations of beneficiaries. Given his current situation, he is unlikely to qualify and would not be able to enroll in the SNP.
 
Mrs. Radford asks whether there are any special eligibility requirements for Medicare Advantage. What should you tell her?
Mrs. Radford must be entitled to Part A and enrolled in Part B to enroll in Medicare Advantage.
 
Mrs. Andrews asked how a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan might affect her access to services since she receives some assistance for her health care costs from the State. What should you tell her?
Medicaid may provide additional benefits, but Medicaid will coordinate benefits only with Medicaid participating providers.
 
Mr. Castillo, a naturalized citizen, previously enrolled in Medicare Part B but has recently stopped paying his Part B premium. Mr. Castillo is still covered by Part A. He would like to enroll in a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan and is still covered by Part A. What should you tell him?
He is not eligible to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan until he re-enrolls in Medicare Part B.
 
Mrs. Davenport enrolled in the ABC Medicare Advantage (MA) plan several years ago. In mid-February of 2021, her doctor confirms a diagnosis of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). What options will Mrs. Davenport have regarding her MA plan during the next open enrollment season?
She may remain in her ABC MA plan, enroll in another MA plan in her service area, or enroll in a Special Needs Plan (SNP) for individuals suffering from ESRD if one is available in her area.
 
Mr. Kumar is considering a Medicare Advantage HMO and has questions about his ability to access providers. What should you tell him?
In most Medicare Advantage HMOs, Mr. Kumar must generally obtain his services only from providers within the plan’s network (except in an emergency or where care is unavailable within the network).
 
Mr. Barker enjoys a comfortable retirement income. He recently had surgery and expected that he would have certain services and items covered by the plan with minimal out-of-pocket costs because his MA-PD coverage has been very good. However, when he received the bill, he was surprised to see large charges in excess of his maximum out-of-pocket limit that included some services and items he thought would be fully covered. He called you to ask what he could do? What could you tell him?
You can offer to review the plans appeal process to help him ask the plan to review the coverage decision.
 
Mr. Sinclair has diabetes and heart trouble and is generally satisfied with the care he has received under Original Medicare, but he would like to know more about Medicare Advantage Special Needs Plans (SNPs). What could you tell him?
SNPs have special programs for enrollees with chronic conditions, like Mr. Sinclair, and they provide prescription drug coverage that could be very helpful as well.
 
Mr. Lopez has heard that he can sign up for a product called “Medicare Advantage” but is not sure about what type of plan designs are available through this program. What should you tell him about the types of health plans that are available through the Medicare Advantage program?
They are Medicare health plans such as HMOs, PPOs, PFFS, and MSAs.
 
Mr. Zachow has a condition for which three drugs are available. He has tried two but had an allergic reaction to them. Only the third drug works for him and it is not on his Part D plan’s formulary. What could you tell him to do?
Mr. Zachow has a right to request a formulary exception to obtain coverage for his Part D drug. He or his physician could obtain the standardized request form on the plan’s website, fill it out, and submit it to his plan.
 
Mr. Bickford did not quite qualify for the extra help low-income subsidy under the Medicare Part D Prescription Drug program and he is wondering if there is any other option he has for obtaining help with his considerable drug costs. What should you tell him?
He could check with the manufacturers of his medications to see if they offer an assistance program to help people with limited means to obtain the medications they need. Alternatively, he could check to see whether his state has a pharmacy assistance program to help him with his expenses.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn both take a specialized multivitamin prescription each day. Mr. Vaughn takes a prescription for helping to regrow his hair. They are anxious to have their Medicare prescription drug plan cover these drug needs. What should you tell them?
Medicare prescription drug plans are not permitted to cover the prescription medications the Vaughns are interested in under Part D coverage, however, plans may cover them as supplemental benefits and the Vaughn’s could look into that possibility.
 
Ms. Edwards is enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan that includes prescription drug plan (PDP) coverage. She is traveling and wishes to fill two of the prescriptions that she has lost. How would you advise her?
She may fill prescriptions for covered drugs at non-network pharmacies, but likely at a higher cost than paid at an in-network pharmacy.
 
Mrs. Lopez is enrolled in a cost plan for her Medicare benefits. She has recently lost creditable coverage previously available through her husband’s employer. She is interested in enrolling in a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan (PDP). What should you tell her?
If a Part D benefit is offered through her plan she may choose to enroll in that plan or a standalone PDP.
 
Mrs. Allen has a rare condition for which two different brand name drugs are the only available treatment. She is concerned that since no generic prescription drug is available and these drugs are very high cost, she will not be able to find a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan that covers either one of them. What should you tell her?
Medicare prescription drug plans are required to cover drugs in each therapeutic category. She should be able to enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan that covers the medications she needs.
 
Mrs. Quinn has just turned 65, is in excellent health and has a relatively high income. She uses no medications and sees no reason to spend money on a Medicare prescription drug plan if she does not need the coverage. She currently does not have creditable coverage. What could you tell her about the implications of such a decision?
If she does not sign up for a Medicare prescription drug plan as soon as she is eligible to do so, and if she does sign up at a later date, her premium will be permanently increased by 1% of the national average premium for every month that she was not covered.
 
Mr. Shultz was still working when he first qualified for Medicare. At that time, he had employer group coverage that was creditable. During his initial Part D eligibility period, he decided not to enroll because he was satisfied with his drug coverage. It is now a year later and Mr. Shultz has lost his employer group coverage within the last two weeks. How would you advise him?
Mr. Schultz should enroll in a Part D plan before he has a 63-day break in coverage in order to avoid a premium penalty.
 
Mrs. Mulcahy, age 65, is concerned that she may not qualify for enrollment in a Medicare prescription drug plan because, although she is entitled to Part A, she is not enrolled under Medicare Part B. What should you tell her?
An individual who is entitled to Part A or enrolled under Part B is eligible to enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan. As long as Mrs. Mulcahy is entitled to Part A, she does not need to enroll under Part B before enrolling in a prescription drug plan.
 
What types of tools can Medicare Part D prescription drug plans use that affect the way their enrollees can access medications?
Part D plans do not have to cover all medications. As a result, their formularies, or lists of covered drugs, will vary from plan to plan. In addition, they can use cost containment techniques such as tiered co-payments and prior authorization.
 
All plans must cover at least the standard Part D coverage or its actuarial equivalent. Which of the following statements best describes some of the costs a beneficiary would incur for prescription drugs under the standard coverage?
Standard Part D coverage would require payment of an annual deductible, and once past the catastrophic coverage threshold, the beneficiary pays whichever is greater of either the co-pays for generic and brand name drugs or coinsurance of 5%.
 
Mr. Jacob understands that there is a standard Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit, but when he looks at information on various plans available in his area, he sees a wide range in what they charge for deductibles, premiums, and cost sharing. How can you explain this to him?
Medicare Part D drug plans may have different benefit structures, but on average, they must all be at least as good as the standard model established by the government.
 
Mr. Carlini has heard that Medicare prescription drug plans are only offered through private companies under a program known as Medicare Advantage (MA), not by the government. He likes Original Medicare and does not want to sign up for an MA product, but he also wants prescription drug coverage. What should you tell him?
Mr. Carlini can stay with Original Medicare and also enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan through a private company that has contracted with the government to provide only such drug coverage to eligible Medicare beneficiaries.
 
Which of the following individuals is most likely to be eligible to enroll in a Part D Plan?
Jose, a grandfather who was granted asylum and has worked in the United States for many years.
 
Mr. Hutchinson has drug coverage through his former employer’s retiree plan. He is concerned about the Part D premium penalty if he does not enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan, but does not want to purchase extra coverage that he will not need. What should you tell him?
If the drug coverage he has is not expected to pay, on average, at least as much as Medicare’s standard Part D coverage expects to pay, then he will need to enroll in Medicare Part D during his initial eligibility period to avoid the late enrollment penalty.
 
Mrs. McIntire is enrolled in her state’s Medicaid plan and has just become eligible for Medicare as well. What can she expect will happen to her drug coverage?
Unless she chooses a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan on her own, she will be automatically enrolled in one available in her area.
 
Mrs. Berkowitz wants to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan that does not include drug coverage and also enroll in a stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan. Under what circumstances can she do this?
If the Medicare Advantage plan is a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan that does not offer drug coverage or a Medical Savings Account plan, Mrs. Berkowitz can do this.
 
Which of the following statements about Medicare Part D are correct?
I. Part D plans must enroll any eligible beneficiary who applies regardless of health status except in limited circumstances.
II. Private fee-for-service (PFFS) plans are not required to use a pharmacy network but may choose to have one.
III. Beneficiaries enrolled in a MA-Medical Savings Account (MSA) plan may only obtain Part D benefits through a standalone PDP.
IV. Beneficiaries enrolled in a MA-PPO may obtain Part D benefits through a standalone PDP or through their plan.
I, II, and III only
 
Mr. Torres has a small savings account. He would like to pay for his monthly Part D premiums with an automatic monthly withdrawal from his savings account until it is exhausted, and then have his premiums withheld from his Social Security check. What should you tell him?
In general, he must select a single Part D premium payment mechanism that will be used throughout the year.
 
You will be holding a sales event soon, at which you would like to offer door prizes to attendees. Under guidelines from the Medicare agency, what types of gifts or prizes would not be allowed in this situation?
Gift cards or gift certificates of $15 or less that can be readily converted to cash.
 
Another agent working for your agency claims that because you are not employed by the Medicare Advantage plans that you represent, you are not subject to the same marketing requirements as the plans themselves. How should you respond to such a statement?
Your coworker is not correct. Marketing on behalf of a plan is considered marketing by the plan and requires that all contracted and employed agents comply with all Medicare marketing rules.
 
Mrs. Lu is turning 65 in November and called to ask for your help deciding on a Medicare Advantage plan. She agreed to sign a scope of appointment form and meet with you on October 15. During the appointment, what are you permitted to do?
You may provide her with the required enrollment materials and take her completed enrollment application.
 
One of your colleagues argues that it is better to focus your time and energy exclusively in neighborhoods with single-family homes. He further argues that their older owners are more likely to have higher incomes and purchase the Medicare Advantage products you represent compared to those living in apartment complexes. How should you respond?
This could be considered discriminatory activity and a prohibited practice.
 
A Medicare beneficiary has walked into your office and requested that you sit down with her and discuss her options under the Medicare Advantage program. Before engaging in such a discussion, what should you do?
You must have her sign a scope of appointment form, indicating which products she wishes to discuss. You may then proceed with the discussion.
 
Your friend’s mother just moved to an assisted living facility and he asked if you could present a program for the residents about the MA-PD plans you market. What could you tell him?
You appreciate the opportunity and would be happy to schedule an appointment with anyone at their request.
 
Melissa Meadows is a marketing representative for Best Care which has recently introduced a Medicare Advantage plan offering comprehensive dental benefits for $15 per month. Best Care has not submitted any potential posts to CMS for approval. Melissa would like to use the power of social media to reach potential prospects. What advice would you give her?
As soon as CMS approves Best Care’s social media posts, Agent Meadows could post a tweet stating that “Best Care offers an array of Medicare Advantage benefit packages. One might be right for you. Call me to find out more!”
 
Agent Jennings makes a presentation on Medicare advertised as an educational event. Agent Jennings distributes materials that are solely educational. However, she gives a brief presentation that mentions plan-specific premiums. Is this a prohibited activity at an event that has been advertised as educational?
Yes. When an event has been advertised as “educational,” discussing plan-specific premiums is impermissible.
 
Agent Martinez wishes to solicit Medicare Advantage prospects through e-mail and asks you for advice as to whether this is possible. What should you tell her?
Marketing representatives may initiate electronic contact through e-mail but an opt-out process must be provided.
 
Miguel Sanchez is a relatively new agent who has come to you for advice as to what he can do during the Medicare Advantage Open Enrollment Period (MA-OEP). What advice should you give Miguel?
During the MA-OEP, Miguel can have one-on-one meetings with beneficiaries who have requested such meetings.
 
ABC is a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan sponsor. It would like to use its enrollees’ information to market non-health related products such as life insurance and annuities. Which statement best describes ABC’s obligation to its enrollees regarding marketing such products?
It must obtain a HIPAA complaint authorization from an enrollee that indicates the plan or plan sponsor may use their information for marketing purposes.
 
You have approached a hospital administrator about marketing in her facility. The administrator is uncomfortable with the suggestion. How could you address her concerns?
Tell her that Medicare guidelines allow you to conduct marketing activities in common areas of a provider’s facility.
 
During a sales presentation, your client asks you whether the Medicare agency recommends that she sign up for your plan or stay in Original Medicare. What should you tell her?
Tell her that the Medicare agency does not endorse or recommend any plan.
 
Agent Armstrong is employed by XYZ Agency, which is under contract with ABC Health Plan, a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan that offers plans in multiple states. XYZ Agency maintains a website marketing the MA plans with which it has contracts. Agent Armstrong follows up with individuals who request more information about ABC MA plans via the website and tries to persuade them to enroll in ABC plans. What statement best describes the marketing and compliance rules that apply to Agent Armstrong?
Agent Armstrong needs to be licensed and appointed in every state in which beneficiaries to whom he markets ABC MA plans are located.
 
You have been providing a pre-Thanksgiving meal during sales presentations in November for many years and your clients look forward to attending this annual event. When marketing Medicare Advantage and Part D plans, what are you permitted to do with respect to meals?
You may provide light snacks, but a Thanksgiving style meal would be prohibited, regardless of who provides or pays for the meal.
 
Next week you will be participating in your first “educational event” for prospective enrollees. To be sure that you do not violate any of the applicable guidelines, in what activities should you plan to engage?
You should plan to ensure that the educational event is an informative event and must not conduct a sales presentation or distribute or accept enrollment forms at the event.
 
You are working several plans and community organizations to sponsor an educational event. When putting together advertisements for this event, what should you do?
You must ensure that the advertisements indicate it is an educational event, otherwise it will be considered a marketing event.
 
Another agent you know has engaged in misconduct that has been verified by the plan she represented. What sort of penalty might the plan impose on this individual?
The plan may withhold commission, require retraining, report the misconduct to a state department of insurance or terminate the contract.
 
You are seeking to represent an individual Medicare Advantage plan and an individual Part D plan in your state. You have completed the required training for each plan, but you did not achieve a passing score on the tests that came after the training. What can you do in this situation?
You will not be able to represent any Medicare Advantage or Part D plan until you complete the training and achieve an adequate score. However, you will not have to take a test if you exclusively market employer/union group plans and the companies do not require testing.
 
Plan sponsors may undertake the following marketing activities with current Medicare Advantage plan members?
Market non-health related items or services such as life insurance or annuities policies to current members as permitted following HIPAA Privacy Rules.
 
Mr. Rockwell, age 67, is enrolled in Medicare Part A, but because he continues to work and is covered by an employer health plan, he has not enrolled in Part B or Part D. He receives a notice on June 1 that his employer is cutting back on prescription drug benefits and that as of July 1 his coverage will no longer be creditable. He has come to you for advice. What advice would you give Mr. Rockwell about special election periods (SEPs)?
Mr. Rockwell is eligible for a SEP due to his involuntary loss of creditable drug coverage; the SEP begins in June and ends on September 1- two months after the loss of creditable coverage.
 
Mrs. Young is currently enrolled in Original Medicare (Parts A and B), but she has been working with Agent Neil Adams in the selection of a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan. It is mid-September, and Mrs. Young is going on vacation. Agent Adams is considering suggesting that he and Mrs. Young complete the application together before she leaves. He will then submit the paper application before the start of the annual enrollment period (AEP). What would you say If you were advising Agent Adams?
This is a bad idea. Agents are generally prohibited from soliciting or accepting an enrollment form before the start of the AEP.
 
Mr. Block is currently enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan that includes drug coverage. He found a stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan in his area that offers better coverage than that available through his MA-PD plan and in addition, has a low premium. It won’t cost him much more and, because he has the means to do so, he wishes to enroll in the stand-alone prescription drug plan in addition to his MA-PD plan. What should you tell him?
If Mr. Block enrolls in the stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan, he will be disenrolled from the Medicare Advantage plan.
 
Mrs. Reeves is newly eligible to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan and her MA Initial Coverage Election Period (ICEP) has just begun. Which of the following can she not do during the ICEP?
She can enroll in a Medigap plan to supplement the benefits of the MA plan that she’s also enrolling in.
 
Mr. Johannsen is entitled to Medicare Part A and Part B. He gains the Part D low-income subsidy. How does that affect his ability to enroll or disenroll in a Part D plan?
He qualifies for a special election period and can enroll in or disenroll from a Part D plan once during that period.
 
Mr. Yoo’s employer has recently dropped comprehensive creditable prescription drug coverage that was offered to company retirees. The company told Mr. Yoo that, because he was affected by this change, he would qualify for a Special election period. Mr. Yoo contacted you to find out more about what this means. What can you tell him?
It means that he qualifies for a one-time opportunity to enroll in an MA-PD or Part D prescription drug plan.
 
Mrs. Schmidt is moving and a friend told her she might qualify for a “Special election period” to enroll in a new Medicare Advantage plan. She contacted you to ask what a special election period is. What could you tell her?
It is a period, outside of the Annual Election Period, when a Medicare beneficiary can select a new or different Medicare Advantage and/or Part D prescription drug plan. Typically the Special election period is beneficiary specific and results from events, such as when the beneficiary moves outside of the service area.
 
Mr. Chen is enrolled in his employer’s group health plan and will be retiring soon. He would like to know his options since he has decided to drop his retiree coverage and is eligible for Medicare. What should you tell him?
Mr. Chen can disenroll from his employer-sponsored coverage to elect a Medicare Advantage or Part D plan within 2 months of his disenrollment.
 
Mrs. Margolis contacts you in August because she will become eligible for Medicare for the first time in November. She would like to meet and discuss plan choices with you. What advice should you give her?
Tell her to wait until October to discuss plan choices with you so that you can share plan benefits for the current year as well as any changes for the following year that may impact her choice.
 
Mrs. Kumar would like her daughter, who lives in another state, to meet with you during the Annual Election Period to help her complete her enrollment in a Part D plan. She asked you when she should have her daughter plan to visit. What could you tell her?
Her daughter should come in November.
 
Mr. Roberts is enrolled in an MA plan. He recently suffered complications following hip replacement surgery. As a result, he has spent the last three months in Resthaven, a skilled nursing facility. Mr. Roberts is about to be discharged. What advice would you give him regarding his health coverage options?
His open enrollment period as an institutionalized individual will continue for two months after the month he moves out of the facility.
 
Mr. White has Medicare Parts A and B with a Part D plan. Last year, he received a notice that his plan sponsor identified him as a “potential at-risk” beneficiary. This month, he started receiving assistance from Medicaid. He wants to find a different Part D plan that’s more suitable to his current prescription drug needs. He believes he’s entitled to a SEP since he is now a dual eligible. Is he able to change to a different Part D plan during a SEP for dual eligible individuals?
No. Once he is identified by the plan sponsor as a “potential at-risk” beneficiary, he cannot use the dual eligible SEP to change plans while this designation is in place.
 
Mr. Ziegler is turning 65 next month and has asked you what he can do, and when he must do it, with respect to enrolling in Part D. What could you tell him?
He is currently in the Part D Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) and, during this time, he may make one Part D enrollment choice, including enrollment in a stand-alone Part D plan or an MA-PD plan.
 
A client wants to give you an enrollment application on October 1 before the beginning of the Annual Election Period because he is leaving on vacation for two weeks and does not want to forget about turning it in. What should you tell him?
You must tell him you are not permitted to take the form. If he sends the form directly to the plan, the plan will process the enrollment on the day the Annual Election Period begins.
 
Mr. Garrett has just entered his MA Initial Coverage Election Period (ICEP). What action could you help him take during this time?
He will have one opportunity to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan.
 
You are meeting with Ms. Berlin and she has completed an enrollment form for a MA-PD plan you represent. You notice that her handwriting is illegible and as a result, the spelling of her street looks incorrect. She asks you to fill in the corrected street name. What should you do?
You may correct this information as long as you add your initials and date next to the correction.
 
You have come to Mrs. Midler’s home for a sales presentation. At the beginning of the presentation, Mrs. Midler tells you that she has a copy of her medical records available because she thinks this will help you understand her needs. She suggests that you will know which questions to ask her about her health status in order to best assist her in selecting a plan. What should you do?
You can only ask Mrs. Midler questions about conditions that affect eligibility, specifically, whether she has one of the conditions that would qualify her for a special needs plan.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Nunez attended one of your sales presentations. They’ve asked you to come to their home to clear up a few questions. During the presentation, Mrs. Nunez feels tired and tells you that her husband can finish things up. She goes to bed. At the end of your discussion, Mr. Nunez says that he wants to enroll both himself and his wife. What should you do?
As long as she can do so, only Mrs. Nunez can sign her enrollment form. Mrs. Nunez will have to wake up to sign her form or do so at another time.
 
When Myra first became eligible for Medicare, she enrolled in Original Medicare (Parts A and B). She is now 67 and will turn 68 on July 1. She would now like to enroll in a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan and approaches you about her options. What advice would you give her?
She should remain in Original Medicare until the annual election period running from October 15 to December 7, during which she can select an MA plan.
 
Since 2004 Ms. Eisenberg has had a Medigap plan that provides some drug coverage. She has recently received a letter from her Medigap carrier informing her that her drug coverage is not “creditable.” She wants to know what this means. What should you tell her?
The letter is to inform her that the drug coverage offered through her Medigap plan does not offer drug coverage that is at least comparable to that provided under the Medicare Part D prescription drug program. If she does not have such creditable coverage during periods when she is first eligible for the Part D program, she will face a premium penalty if she enrolls in a Part D plan at a later date.
 
Mr. Cole has been a Medicaid beneficiary for some time, and recently qualified for Medicare as well. He is concerned about changes in his cost-sharing. What should you tell him?
He should know that Medicaid will pay cost sharing only for services provided by Medicaid participating providers.
 
Mrs. Wu was primarily a homemaker and employed in jobs that provided taxable income only sporadically. Her husband worked full-time throughout his long career. She has heard that to qualify for Medicare Part A she has to have worked and paid Medicare taxes for a sufficient time. What should you tell her?
Since her husband paid Medicare taxes during the entire time he was working, she will automatically qualify for Medicare Part A without having to pay any premiums.
 
A Medicare beneficiary has walked into your office and requested that you sit down with her and discuss her options under the Medicare Advantage program. Before engaging in such a discussion, what should you do?
You must have her sign a scope of appointment form, indicating which products she wishes to discuss. You may then proceed with the discussion.
 
Mr. Perry is entitled to Medicare Part A but has not yet enrolled in Part B, even though he is 69 years old. He would like to enroll in a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan but is concerned that he will have to sign up for Part B as well in order to qualify for enrollment in a Part D plan. What should you tell him?
He does not have to enroll in Part B but, must pay a penalty for his failure to do so when he first turned 65. After that, he can enroll in a Part D prescription drug plan.
 
Mr. Nguyen understands that Medicare prescription drug plans can use a formulary or list of covered drugs. He is suspicious about how plans establish these formularies. What should you tell him?
Formularies must be developed with input from pharmacists, doctors, and other experts.
 
ACA Section 1557 rules for disability concern
Policies and procedures, physical access, and communication.
 
Under ACA Section 1557, a health plan premium sold through a state exchange may, based on an individual’s age,
charge higher premiums.
 
Which of the following statements best describes Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA)?
Section 1557 incorporates earlier civil rights protections in regard to race, color, national origin, disability, age and sex.
 
Which Medicare programs are covered by ACA Section 1557?
Parts A, C, and D, but not B.
 
As a result of violations of ACA Section 1557 nondiscrimination rules,
a health plan may revoke an agent or broker’s appointment with the health plan.
 
Which of the following statements best describes the scope of operations subject to Section 1557 under the 2020 Final Rule?
Health insurers under the 2020 Final Rule are not considered to be principally engaged in delivering health care, and thus lines of business that do not receive federal funding or administered under Title I of the ACA, such as life insurance, do not fall under the scope of 1557.
 
Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act applies to
all health programs and activities administered by or receiving federal financial assistance from HHS
 
Under Section 1557, 2020 Final Rule issued during the Trump Administration sex was initially defined____________
as biologic sex only, meaning whether a person was determined to be male or female at birth.
 
Which of the following would be considered permissible under Section 1557 and the 2020 Final Rule?
Broker Mary Jones has recruited a diverse workforce. She encourages her agents to prospect through community-based marketing and within their community of influence.
 
Auxiliary aids and services must be provided to individuals with disabilities, such as those suffering from vision or hearing impairments, free of charge, and in a timely manner. Auxiliary aids and services include which of the following:
I. large print materials
II. qualified sign language interpreters
III. braille materials and displays
IV. screen reader software
I, II, III, and IV
 
Which entity enforces Section 1557 for programs that receive funding from on are administered by HHS?
The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) of HHS.
 
Which of these actions is most likely to be permitted in dealing with a person with limited English proficiency?
Allowing a child to interpret in an emergency.
 
Under ACA Section 1557, a health plan
cannot deny coverage to LEP individuals and is required to provide language assistance to them, free of charge.
 
For a health plan, what are the possible consequences of violations of ACA Section 1557?
Loss of federal business and compensatory damages.
 
Which of the following is NOT potentially a penalty for violation of a law or regulation prohibiting fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA)?
Deportation
 
Which of the following requires intent to obtain payment and the knowledge the actions are wrong?
Fraud
 
You are performing a regular inventory of the controlled substances in the pharmacy. You discover a minor inventory discrepancy. What should you do?
Follow your pharmacy’s procedures
 
Your job is to submit a risk diagnosis to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) for the purpose of payment. As part of this job, you use a process to verify the data is accurate. Your immediate supervisor tells you to ignore the Sponsor’s process and to adjust or add risk diagnosis codes for certain individuals. What should you do?
Report the incident to the compliance department (via compliance hotline or other mechanism)
 
You are in charge of paying claims submitted by providers. You notice a certain diagnostic provider (“Doe Diagnostics”) requested a substantial payment for a large number of members. Many of these claims are for a certain procedure. You review the same type of procedure for other diagnostic providers and realize Doe Diagnostics’ claims far exceed any other provider you reviewed. What should you do?
Consult with your immediate supervisor for next steps or contact the compliance department (via compliance hotline, Special Investigations Unit [SIU], or other mechanism)
 
A person drops off a prescription for a beneficiary who is a “regular” customer. The prescription is for a controlled substance with a quantity of 160. This beneficiary normally receives a quantity of 60, not 160. You review the prescription and have concerns about possible forgery. What is your next step?
Call the prescriber to verify the quantity
 
Waste includes any misuse of resources, such as the overuse of services or other practices that directly or indirectly result in unnecessary costs to the Medicare Program.
True
 
Bribes or kickbacks of any kind for services that are paid under a Federal health care program (which includes Medicare) constitute fraud by the person making as well as the person receiving them.
True
 
These are examples of issues that should be reported to a Compliance Department: suspected fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA); potential health privacy violation, unethical behavior, and employee misconduct.
True
 
Abuse involves payment for items or services when there is no legal entitlement to that payment and the provider has not knowingly or intentionally misrepresented facts to obtain payment.
True
 
Ways to report potential fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA) include:
a. Mail drops
b. Special Investigative Units (SIUs)
c. Tekephone hotlines
d. All of the above
e. In-person reporting to the compliance department/supervisor
All of the above
 
Once a corrective action plan is started, the corrective action plan must be monitored annually to ensure they are effective.
False
 
What are some of the penalties for violating fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA) laws?
a.Civil Monetary Penalties
b.Imprisonment
c.All of the above
d.Exclusion from participation in all Federal health care programs
All of the above
 
Any person who knowingly submits false claims to the Government is liable for five times the Government’s damages caused by the violator plus a penalty.
False
 
Some of the laws governing Medicare Part C and D fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA) include the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the False Claims Act the Anti-Kickback Statute, and the Health Care Fraud Statute.
False
 
You can help prevent fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA) by doing all the following:
Look for suspicious activity
Conduct yourself in an ethical manner
Ensure accurate and timely data and billing
Ensure you coordinate with other payers
Keep up to date with FWA policies and procedures, standards of conduct, laws, regulations, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) guidance
Verify all information provided to you
True
 
You are performing a regular inventory of the controlled substances in the pharmacy. You discover a minor inventory discrepancy. What should you do?
Follow your pharmacy’s procedures
 
You work for a Sponsor. Last month, while reviewing a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) monthly report, you identified multiple individuals not enrolled in the plan but for whom the Sponsor is paid. You spoke to your supervisor who said don’t worry about it. This month, you identify the same enrollees on the report again. What should you do?
Although you know about the Sponsor’s non-retaliation policy, you are still nervous about reporting—to be safe, you submit a report through your compliance department’s anonymous tip line to avoid identification
 
You discover an unattended email address or fax machine in your office receiving beneficiary appeals requests. You suspect no one is processing the appeals. What should you do?
Contact your compliance department (via compliance hotline or other mechanism)
 
A sales agent, employed by the Sponsor’s first-tier, downstream, or related entity (FDR), submitted an application for processing and requested two things: 1) to back-date the enrollment date by one month, and 2) to waive all monthly premiums for the beneficiary. What should you do?
Process the application properly (without the requested revisions)—inform your supervisor and the compliance officer about the sales agent’s request
 
Ways to report a compliance issue include:
a.In-person reporting to the compliance department/supervisor
b.Report on the Sponsor’s website
c.Telephone hotlines
d.All of the above
All of the above
 
Compliance is the responsibility of the Compliance Officer, Compliance Committee, and Upper Management only.
False
 
What is the policy of non-retaliation?
Protects employees, who in good faith report suspected non-compliance
 
Medicare Parts C and D sponsors are not required to have a compliance program.
False
 
At a minimum, an effective compliance program includes four core requirements.
False
 
Correcting non-compliance________
Protects enrollees, avoids recurrence of same non-compliance, and promotes efficiency
 
These are examples of issues that can be reported to a Compliance Department: suspected fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA), potential health privacy violation, and unethical behavior/employee misconduct.
True
 
Once a corrective action plan begins addressing non-compliance for fraud, waste, and abuse (FWA) committed by a Sponsor’s employee or first-tier, downstream, or related entity’s (FDR’s) employee, ongoing monitoring of the corrective actions is not necessary.
False
 
Standards of Conduct are the same for every Medicare Parts C and D sponsor.
False
 
What are some of the consequences for non-compliance, fraudulent, or unethical behavior?
a.Exclusion from participating kin all Federal health care programs
b.Termination of employment
c.Disciplinary action
d.All of the above
All of the above
 
Ms. Levi is considering enrollment in a Medicare Advantage HMO plan offered in her area. Ms. Levi often travels to visit relatives and is concerned that she may need emergency care outside of her plan’s service area. What should you tell her about coverage of emergency care?
Plans are required to cover out-of-network emergency care.
 
Ms. Morris will turn 65 on June 10th. She has never previously qualified for Medicare. She is entitled to Medicare Part A and intends to enroll in Part B. She wants to know if she is eligible to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan that includes prescription drug coverage. What do you tell her?
Ms. Morris can enroll in an MA-PD plan now since her initial election period (IEP) for Part D prescription drug coverage and initial coverage period are occurring together beginning March 1st and ending September 30th.
 
Agent Marvin Millner wants to reach out to his current clients for referrals. What advice would you give to Marvin?
Marvin should understand that under CMS guidelines he can no longer provide gifts, even of minimal value, in exchange for referrals. NOT SURE
 
Mr. Chen has heard about a Medical Savings Account (MSA) but wants to know if it is just about saving money, or if he will get insurance coverage for his health care expenditures as well. What should you tell him?
Under the Medicare Advantage program, a MSA plan involves the combination of a high deductible health plan and a savings account for health expenses. Medicare will make contributions to this savings account to help him pay his health care expenses while in the deductible. NOT SURE
 
Ms. Lewis understands that Medicare prescription drug plans may use various methods to control the use of specific drugs. She has heard about a technique called “step therapy” and is wondering if you can explain what that is. What should you tell her?
Step therapy involves using one or more lower priced drugs before trying a more expensive drug when all are used to treat the same condition.
 
Ms. Stuart has heard about a special needs plan (SNP) that one of her friends is enrolled in and is interested in that product. She wants to be sure she also has coverage for prescription drugs. Would she be able to obtain drug coverage if she enrolled in the SNP?
Yes. All SNPs are required to provide Part D coverage for prescription drugs.
 
Agent Roderick enrolls retiree Mrs. Martinez in a medical savings account (MSA) Medicare health plan. The MSA plan does not offer prescription drug coverage, so Agent Roderick also enrolls Mrs. Martinez in a standalone prescription drug plan (PDP). What CMS compensation rules apply to this situation?
This situation is considered a “dual enrollment,” and CMS compensation rules are applied to the two plans at once and independently of each other.
 
Mr. Olsen is concerned that a Medicare Advantage plan will not cover the same range of services that would be covered under Original fee-for-service Medicare. What should you tell him?
Though their cost-sharing may differ from Original Medicare’s, Medicare Advantage plans are required to cover all services covered by original Medicare.
 
Mrs. Wellington is enrolled in Parts A and B of Original Medicare. A friend recently told her that there is an excellent Medicare Advantage (MA) plan with a five-star rating serving her area. On January 15 she comes to you for advice as to what options, if any, she has. What should you say regarding special enrollment periods (SEPs)?
Mrs. Wellington is eligible for a SEP that may be used once until November 30 to enroll in the five-star plan.
 
Ms. Gardner is currently enrolled in an MA-PD plan. However, she wants to disenroll from the MA-PD plan and instead enroll in a Part D only plan and go back to Original Medicare. According to Medicare’s enrollment guidelines, when could she do this?
She may make such a change during the Annual Election Period that runs from Oct. 15 to December 7, or during the MA Open Enrollment Period which takes place from January 1- March 31 of each year.
 
Mr. Lopez, who is fairly well-off financially, would like to enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan you represent and simply give you a check to cover his premiums for the entire year. What should you tell him?
Enrollees should pay using automatic withdrawal from a bank account or credit or debit card, direct monthly billing from the plan, or deductions from their Social Security check.
 
Ms. Jensen has heard about “Original Fee-for-Service Medicare” and “Private Fee-for-Service” plans. She wants to know what the difference is if any. What should you tell her?
PFFS plans are a type of Medicare Advantage plan offered by private companies.
 
Ms. Bushman has two homes in different states and is concerned about restrictions on where she can get her medications. What should you tell her?
Part D prescription drug plans use networks of pharmacies within their service areas. She could look for a plan that maintains a network in both states. NOT SURE
 
Who is most likely to be eligible to enroll in a Part D prescription drug plan?
Ms. Davis who is entitled to Part A and has just enrolled in Part B.a sales presentation, your client asks you wh
 
Mr. Lopez takes several high-cost prescription drugs. He would like to enroll in a standalone Part D prescription drug plan that is available in his area. In what type of Medicare Health Plan can he enroll?
Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan that does not include drug coverage.
 
If a beneficiary is enrolled in a stand-alone prescription drug plan and wants to keep that plan, what type of Medicare health plan could the individual also enroll in, without being automatically disenrolled from the stand-alone prescription drug plan?
The beneficiary could enroll in a private fee-for-service (PFFS) plan that does not include prescription drug coverage; a cost plan; or a Medicare Medical Savings Account (MSA) plan.
 
Mr. Moreno invited his neighbor, Agent Tom Smith, to discuss Medicare Advantage (MA) and Part D plans that Agent Smith sells at the regular Tuesday brunch the neighbors have for senior citizens. What should Agent Tom Smith tell Mr. Moreno about the kinds of food that can be provided to potential enrollees who attend the sales presentation?
A meal cannot be provided, but light snacks would be permitted
 
Which of the following is/are most likely to be characterized as an involuntary disenrollment from a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan?
I. The enrollee dies.
II. An SNP enrollee loses special needs status due to substantially improved health.
III. It is determined that the member is not lawfully present in the United States.
IV. The member enrolls in another plan during the Annual Open Enrollment period.
I, II, and III only
Mr. Sanchez is entitled to Part A, but has not enrolled in Part B because he has coverage through an employer plan. If he wants to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan, what will he have to do?c. He will have to enroll in Part B. Correct
Mr. Kelly wants to know whether he is eligible to sign up for a Private fee-for-service (PFFS) plan. What questions would you need to ask to determine his eligibility?a. You would need to ask Mr. Kelly if he is enrolled in Part A and Part B and if he lives in the PFFS plan’s service area. Correct
Mr. Gonzalez is entitled to Part A, but has not yet enrolled in Part B. If he wants to enroll in a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan, what will he have to do?d. He will have to enroll in Part B prior to enrolling in the PFFS plan. Correct
Mrs. Berkowitz wants to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan that does not include drug coverage and also enroll in a stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan. Under what circumstances can she do this?c. If the Medicare Advantage plan is a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan that does not offer drug coverage or a Medical Savings Account, Mrs. Berkowitz can do this. Correct
Which of the following individuals is most likely to be eligible to enroll in a Medicare Advantage or Part D Plan?d. Jose, a grandfather who was granted asylum and has worked in the United States for many years. Correct
Mr. and Mrs. Nunez attended one of your sales presentations. They’ve asked you to come to their home to clear up a few questions. During the presentation, Mrs. Nunez feels tired and tells you that her husband can finish things up. She goes to bed. At the end of your discussion, Mr. Nunez says that he wants to enroll both himself and his wife. What should you do?d. As long as she is able to do so, only Mrs. Nunez can sign her enrollment form. Mrs. Nunez will have to wake up to sign her form or do so at another time. Correct
You are visiting with Mr. Tully and his daughter at her request. He has advanced Alzheimer’s and is incapable of understanding the implications of choosing a Medicare Advantage or prescription drug plan. Can his daughter fill out the enrollment form and sign it for him?c. Mr. Tully’s daughter can do so only, if she is authorized under state law as a court-appointed legal guardian, has durable power of attorney for health care decisions, or is authorized under state surrogate consent laws to make health decisions. Correct
You are meeting with Ms. Berlin and she has completed an enrollment form for a MA-PD plan you represent. You notice that her handwriting is illegible and as a result, the spelling of her street looks incorrect. She asks you to fill in the corrected street name. What should you do?c. You may correct this information as long as you add your initials and date next to the correction Correct
Mr. Block is currently enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan that includes drug coverage. He found a stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan in his area that offers better coverage than that available through his MA-PD plan and in addition has a low premium. It won’t cost him much more and, because he has the means to do so, he wishes to enroll in the stand-alone prescription drug plan in addition to his MA-PD plan. What should you tell him?c. If Mr. Block enrolls in the stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan, he will be disenrolled from the Medicare Advantage plan. Correct
You are doing a sales presentation for Mrs. Pearson. You know that the Medicare marketing guidelines prohibit certain types of statements. Apply those guidelines to the following statements and identify which would be prohibited.d. “If you’re not in very good health, you will probably do better with a different product.” Correct
 
Mr. Moy’s wife has a Medicare Advantage plan, but he wants to understand what coverage Medicare Supplemental Insurance provides since his health care needs are different from his wife’s needs. What could you tell Mr. Moy? a. Medicare Supplemental Insurance would cover all of his IRS approved health care expenditures not covered under Original Fee-for-Service (FFS) Medicare. b. Medicare Supplemental Insurance would cover his dental, vision and hearing services only. c. Medicare Supplemental Insurance would help cover his Part A and Part B cost sharing in Original Fee-for-Service (FFS) Medicare as well as possibly some services that Medicare does not cover. d. Medicare Supplemental Insurance would cover his long-term care services.
C. . Medicare Supplemental Insurance would help cover his Part A and Part B cost sharing in Original Fee-for-Service (FFS) Medicare as well as possibly some services that Medicare does not cover. Correct: Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap) helps to cover Part A and Part B cost-sharing in Original Medicare as well as possibly offering some services such as medical care when a beneficiary travels outside the United States.
 
Mr. Schmidt would like to plan for retirement and has asked you what is covered under Original Fee-for-Service (FFS) Medicare? What could you tell him? a. Part C, which always covers dental and vision services, is covered under Original Medicare. b. Part D, which covers prescription drug services, is covered under Original Medicare. c. Part A, which covers hospital, skilled nursing facility, hospice, and home health services and Part B, which covers professional services such as those provided by a doctor are covered under Original Medicare. d. Part A, which covers long term custodial care services, is covered under Original Medicare.
c. Part A, which covers hospital, skilled nursing facility, hospice, and home health services and Part B, which covers professional services such as those provided by a doctor are covered under Original Medicare. Correct: Original Medicare consists of Part A and Part B.
 
Anita Magri will turn age 65 in August 2020. Anita intends to enroll in Original Medicare Part A and Part B. She would also like to enroll in a Medicare Supplement (Medigap) plan. Anita’s older neighbor Mel has told her about the Medigap Part F plan in which he is enrolled. It not only provides foreign travel emergency benefits but also covers his Medicare Part B deductible. Anita comes to you for advice. What should you tell her? a. You would be happy to help Anita enroll in a Medigap plan but before she can do so, she must also enroll in a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan. b. You are sorry to disappoint Anita but Medigap plans are no longer available to those who turn age 65 after January 1, 2020. Anita should instead consider a Medicare Advantage plan. c. You are sorry to disappoint Anita but a Medigap Part F plan is no longer available to those who turn age 65 after January 1,2020. Anita might instead consider other Medigap plans that offer foreign travel benefits but do not cover the Part B deductible. d. You would be happy to help Anita enroll in a Medigap Part F plan will provide foreign travel benefits as a well as cover her Part B deductible.
c. You are sorry to disappoint Anita but a Medigap Part F plan is no longer available to those who turn age 65 after January 1,2020. Anita might instead consider other Medigap plans that offer foreign travel benefits but do not cover the Part B deductible. Correct: Individuals who attain age 65 on or after January 1, 2020 cannot purchase a Medigap plan that pays the Part B deductible. Generally, these are plans C, F, or high deductible F. Anita can still purchase a Medigap plan that provides foreign travel emergency benefits such as plan G.
 
Mrs. Quinn recently turned 66 and decided after many years of work to begin receiving Social Security benefits. Shortly thereafter Mrs. Quinn received a letter informing her that she has been automatically enrolled in Medicare Part B. She wants to understand what this means. What should you tell Mrs. Quinn? a. She will need to pay no premiums for Part B as she qualifies for premium-free coverage due to the number of quarters she has worked. b. She should disenroll if she does not want to pay the monthly premiums. There is no disadvantage in doing so. c. Part B will cover her dental and vision needs. d. Part B primarily covers physician services. She will be paying a monthly premium and, with the exception of many preventive and screening tests, generally will have 20% coinsurance for these services, in addition to an annual deductible.
d. Part B primarily covers physician services. She will be paying a monthly premium and, with the exception of many preventive and screening tests, generally will have 20% coinsurance for these services, in addition to an annual deductible. Correct: Medicare Part B primarily covers physician services. Enrollees pay a monthly premium based on their income level and have 20 percent coinsurance cost-sharing with the exception of preventive benefits.
 
Mrs. Turner is comparing her employer’s retiree insurance to Original Medicare and would like to know which of the following services Original Medicare will cover if the appropriate criteria are met? What could you tell her? a. Original Medicare covers ambulance services. b. Original Medicare covers cosmetic surgery. c. Original Medicare covers routine dental care. d. Original Medicare covers routine long-term custodial care.
a. Original Medicare covers ambulance services. Correct: Original Medicare does cover ambulance services.
 
Mr. Xi will soon turn age 65 and has come to you for advice as to what services are provided under Original Medicare. What should you tell Mr. Xi that best describes the health coverage provided to Medicare beneficiaries? a. Beneficiaries under Original Medicare have no cost-sharing for most preventive services which include immunizations such as annual flu shots. b. Medicare Part A generally covers medically necessary physician and other health care professional services. c. Benefits covered by Medicare Parts A and B include routine dental care, hearing aids, and routine eye care. d. Medicare Part B generally provides prescription drug coverage.
a. Beneficiaries under Original Medicare have no cost-sharing for most preventive services which include immunizations such as annual flu shots. Correct: Beneficiaries enrolled in both Original Medicare (Parts A and B) have no cost-sharing for most preventive services. These services include immunizations such as annual flu shots.
 
Ms. Moore plans to retire when she turns 65 in a few months. She is in excellent health and will have considerable income when she retires. She is concerned that her income will make it impossible for her to qualify for Medicare. What could you tell her to address her concern? a. Eligibility for Medicare is based on whether or not a person has ever been employed by the federal government. If she or her husband were ever employed by the federal government, she can enroll in Medicare. b. Medicare is a program for people age 65 or older and those under age 65 with certain disabilities, end-stage renal disease, and Lou Gehrig’s disease so she will be eligible for Medicare. c. Medicare is a program for people who have incomes and assets below specific limits, so you will have to find out her exact financial situation before telling her whether she can obtain Medicare coverage. d. Medicare is a program for people of all ages with specific mental health disabilities. Since she is in excellent health, she would not qualify, but should instead look into her state’s Medicaid program if she wants further coverage.
b. Medicare is a program for people age 65 or older and those under age 65 with certain disabilities, end-stage renal disease, and Lou Gehrig’s disease so she will be eligible for Medicare. Correct: Individuals that meet these criteria may be eligible to participate in Medicare. It is not based on income.
 
Mrs. Fiore is a retired federal worker with coverage under a Federal Employee Health Benefits (FEHB) plan that includes creditable drug coverage. She is ready to turn 65 and become Medicare eligible for the first time. What issues might she consider about whether to enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan?
She could compare the coverage to see if the Medicare Part D plan offers better benefits and coverage than the FEHB plan for the specific medications she needs and whether any additional benefits are worth the Part D premium costs on top of her FEHB contribution.
 
Mrs. Roswell is a new Medicare beneficiary who has just retired from retail work. She is interested in selecting a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan. She takes a number of medications and is concerned that she has not been able to identify a plan that covers all of her medications. She does not want to make an abrupt change to new drugs that would be covered and asks what she should do. What should you tell her?
Every Part D drug plan is required to cover a single one-month fill of her existing medications sometime during a 90-day transition period.
 
Mr. Shapiro gets by on a very small amount of fixed income. He has heard there may be extra help paying for Part D prescription drugs for Medicare beneficiaries with limited income. He wants to know whether he might qualify. What should you tell him?
The extra help is available to beneficiaries whose income and assets do not exceed annual limits specified by the government.
 
Ms. Edwards is enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan that includes prescription drug plan (PDP) coverage. She is traveling and wishes to fill two of the prescriptions that she has lost. How would you advise her?
She may fill prescriptions for covered drugs at non-network pharmacies, but likely at a higher cost than paid at an in-network pharmacy.
 
Which of the following statements about Medicare Part D are correct? I. Part D plans must enroll any eligible beneficiary who applies regardless of health status except in limited circumstances. II. Private fee-for-service (PFFS) plans are not required to use a pharmacy network but may choose to have one. III. Beneficiaries enrolled in a MA-Medical Savings Account (MSA) plan may only obtain Part D benefits through a standalone PDP. IV. Beneficiaries enrolled in a MA-PPO may obtain Part D benefits through a standalone PDP or through their plan.
I, II, and III only
 
Mrs. Allen has a rare condition for which two different brand name drugs are the only available treatment. She is concerned that since no generic prescription drug is available and these drugs are very high cost, she will not be able to find a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan that covers either one of them. What should you tell her?
Medicare prescription drug plans are required to cover drugs in each therapeutic category. She should be able to enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan that covers the medications she needs.
 
Mr. Rice is 68, actively working and has coverage for medical services and medications through his employer’s group health plan. He is entitled to premium free Part A and thinking of enrolling in Part B and switching to an MA-PD because he is paying a very large part of his group coverage premium and it does not provide coverage for a number of his medications. Which of the following is NOT a consideration when making the change?
Mr. Rice’s retiree plan is required to take him back if, within 63 days of having voluntarily quit the employer’s plan, he decides that he prefers it to his Medicare Part D plan.
 
Mr. Bickford did not quite qualify for the extra help low-income subsidy under the Medicare Part D Prescription Drug program and he is wondering if there is any other option he has for obtaining help with his considerable drug costs. What should you tell him?
He could check with the manufacturers of his medications to see if they offer an assistance program to help people with limited means to obtain the medications they need. Alternatively, he could check to see whether his state has a pharmacy assistance program to help him with his expenses.
 
All plans must cover at least the standard Part D coverage or its actuarial equivalent. Which of the following statements best describes some of the costs a beneficiary would incur for prescription drugs under the standard coverage?
Standard Part D coverage would require payment of an annual deductible, and once past the catastrophic coverage threshold, the beneficiary pays whichever is greater of either the co-pays for generic and brand name drugs or coinsurance of 5%.
 
What types of tools can Medicare Part D prescription drug plans use that affect the way their enrollees can access medications?
Part D plans do not have to cover all medications. As a result, their formularies, or lists of covered drugs, will vary from plan to plan. In addition, they can use cost containment techniques such as tiered co-payments and prior authorization.
 
Mr. Zachow has a condition for which three drugs are available. He has tried two but had an allergic reaction to them. Only the third drug works for him and it is not on his Part D plan’s formulary. What could you tell him to do?
Mr. Zachow has a right to request a formulary exception to obtain coverage for his Part D drug. He or his physician could obtain the standardized request form on the plan’s website, fill it out, and submit it to his plan
 
One of your clients, Lauren Nichols, has heard about a Medicare concept from one of her neighbors called TrOOP. She asks you to explain it. What do you say?
TrOOP stands for true out-of-pocket expenses that count toward the Medicare Part D catastrophic limit and include not only expenses paid by a beneficiary but also in some instances drug manufacturer discounts.
 
Mr. Schultz was still working when he first qualified for Medicare. At that time, he had employer group coverage that was creditable. During his initial Part D eligibility period, he decided not to enroll because he was satisfied with his drug coverage. It is now a year later and Mr. Schultz has lost his employer group coverage within the last two weeks. How would you advise him?
Mr. Schultz should enroll in a Part D plan before he has a 63-day break in coverage in order to avoid a premium penalty.
 
Mr. Hutchinson has drug coverage through his former employer’s retiree plan. He is concerned about the Part D premium penalty if he does not enroll in a Medicare prescription drug plan, but does not want to purchase extra coverage that he will not need. What should you tell him?
If the drug coverage he has is not expected to pay, on average, at least as much as Medicare’s standard Part D coverage expects to pay, then he will need to enroll in Medicare Part D during his initial eligibility period to avoid the late enrollment penalty.
 
Mr. Sanchez is entitled to Part A, but has not enrolled in Part B because he has coverage through an employer plan. If he wants to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan, what will he have to do?
c. He will have to enroll in Part B. Correct
 
Mr. Kelly wants to know whether he is eligible to sign up for a Private fee-for-service (PFFS) plan. What questions would you need to ask to determine his eligibility?
a. You would need to ask Mr. Kelly if he is enrolled in Part A and Part B and if he lives in the PFFS plan’s service area. Correct
 
Mr. Gonzalez is entitled to Part A, but has not yet enrolled in Part B. If he wants to enroll in a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan, what will he have to do?
d. He will have to enroll in Part B prior to enrolling in the PFFS plan. Correct
 
Mrs. Berkowitz wants to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan that does not include drug coverage and also enroll in a stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan. Under what circumstances can she do this?
c. If the Medicare Advantage plan is a Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) plan that does not offer drug coverage or a Medical Savings Account, Mrs. Berkowitz can do this. Correct
 
Which of the following individuals is most likely to be eligible to enroll in a Medicare Advantage or Part D Plan?
d. Jose, a grandfather who was granted asylum and has worked in the United States for many years. Correct
 
Mr. and Mrs. Nunez attended one of your sales presentations. They’ve asked you to come to their home to clear up a few questions. During the presentation, Mrs. Nunez feels tired and tells you that her husband can finish things up. She goes to bed. At the end of your discussion, Mr. Nunez says that he wants to enroll both himself and his wife. What should you do?
d. As long as she is able to do so, only Mrs. Nunez can sign her enrollment form. Mrs. Nunez will have to wake up to sign her form or do so at another time. Correct
 
You are visiting with Mr. Tully and his daughter at her request. He has advanced Alzheimer’s and is incapable of understanding the implications of choosing a Medicare Advantage or prescription drug plan. Can his daughter fill out the enrollment form and sign it for him?
c. Mr. Tully’s daughter can do so only, if she is authorized under state law as a court-appointed legal guardian, has durable power of attorney for health care decisions, or is authorized under state surrogate consent laws to make health decisions. Correct
 
You are meeting with Ms. Berlin and she has completed an enrollment form for a MA-PD plan you represent. You notice that her handwriting is illegible and as a result, the spelling of her street looks incorrect. She asks you to fill in the corrected street name. What should you do?
c. You may correct this information as long as you add your initials and date next to the correction Correct
 
Phiona works in the IT Department of BestCare Health Plan. Phiona is placed in charge of BestCare’s efforts to facilitate electronic enrollment in its Medicare Advantage plans. In setting up the enrollment site, which of the following must Phiona consider? I. If a legal representative is completing an electronic enrollment request, he or she must first upload proof of his or her authority. II. All data elements required to complete an enrollment request must be captured. III. The process must include a clear and distinct step that requires the applicant to activate an “Enroll Now” or “I Agree” type of button or tool. IV. The mechanism must capture an accurate time and date stamp at the time the applicant enters the online site.
b. II and III only Correct
 
Mr. Block is currently enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan that includes drug coverage. He found a stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan in his area that offers better coverage than that available through his MA-PD plan and in addition has a low premium. It won’t cost him much more and, because he has the means to do so, he wishes to enroll in the stand-alone prescription drug plan in addition to his MA-PD plan. What should you tell him?
c. If Mr. Block enrolls in the stand-alone Medicare prescription drug plan, he will be disenrolled from the Medicare Advantage plan. Correct
 
You are doing a sales presentation for Mrs. Pearson. You know that the Medicare marketing guidelines prohibit certain types of statements. Apply those guidelines to the following statements and identify which would be prohibited.
d. “If you’re not in very good health, you will probably do better with a different product.” Correct
 
You have come to Mrs. Midler’s home for a sales presentation. At the beginning of the presentation, Mrs. Midler tells you that she has a copy of her medical record available because she thinks this will help you understand her needs. She suggests that you will know which questions to ask her about her health status in order to best assist her in selecting a plan. What should you do?
b. You can only ask Mrs. Midler questions about conditions that affect eligibility, specifically, whether she has end stage renal disease or one of the conditions that would qualify her for a special needs plan. Correct
 
Willard works as a representative focused on the senior marketplace. What would be considered prohibited activity by Willard?
a. Implying that only seniors can enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan when meeting with Mr. Hernandez, who is 58 but qualifies for Medicare because she is disabled. Correct
 
Mr. Garrett has just entered his MA Initial Coverage Election Period (ICEP). What action could you help him take during this time?
c. He will have one opportunity to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan Correct
 
Mrs. Kendrick is six months away from turning 65. She wants to know what she will have to do to enroll in a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan as soon as possible. What could you tell her?
c. She may enroll in an MA plan beginning three months immediately before her first entitlement to both Medicare Part A and Part B. Correct
 
Mr. Ziegler is turning 65 next month and has asked you what he can do, and when he must do it, with respect to enrolling in Part D. What could you tell him?
a. He is currently in the Part D Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) and, during this time, he may make one Part D enrollment choice, including enrollment in a stand-alone Part D plan or an MA-PD plan. Correct
 
Ms. Claggett is sixty-six (66) years old. She has been covered under both Parts A and B of Original Medicare for the last six years due to her disability, has never been enrolled in a Medicare Advantage or a Part D plan before. She wants to enroll in a Part D plan. She knows that there is such a thing as the “Part D Initial Enrollment Period” and has concluded that, since she has never enrolled in such a plan before, she should be eligible to enroll under this period. What should you tell her about how the Part D Initial Enrollment Period applies to her situation?
c. It occurs three months before and three months after the month when a beneficiary meets the eligibility requirements for Part B, so she will not be able to use it as a justification for enrolling in a Part D plan now. Correct
 
When Myra first became eligible for Medicare, she enrolled in Original Medicare (Parts A and B). She is now 67 and will turn 68 on July 1. She would now like to enroll in a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan and approaches you about her options. What advice would you give her?
d. She should remain in Original Medicare until the annual election period running from October 15 to December 7, during which she can select an MA plan. Correct
 
Mr. Ford enrolled in an MA-only plan in mid-November during the Annual Election Period. On December 1, he calls you up and says that he has changed his mind and would like to enroll into an MA-PD plan. What enrollment rules would apply in this case?
d. He can make as many enrollment changes as he likes during the Annual Election Period and the last choice made prior to the end of the period will be the effective one as of January 1. Correct
 
Mrs. Kumar would like her daughter, who lives in another state, to meet with you during the Annual Election Period to help her complete her enrollment in a Part D plan. She asked you when she should have her daughter plan to visit. What could you tell her?
d. Her daughter should come in November. Correct
 
Mr. Anderson is a very organized individual and has filled out and brought to you an enrollment form on October 10 for a new plan available January 1 next year. He is currently enrolled in Original Medicare. What should you do?
a. Tell Mr. Anderson that you cannot accept any enrollment forms until the annual election period begins. Correct
 
A client wants to give you an enrollment application on October 1 prior to the beginning of the Annual Election Period because he is leaving on vacation for two weeks and does not want to forget about turning it in. What should you tell him?
c. You must tell him you are not permitted to take the form. If he sends the form directly to the plan, the plan will process the enrollment on the day the Annual Election Period begins. Correct
 
Mrs. Goodman enrolled in an MA-PD plan during the Annual Election Period. In mid-January of the following year, she wants to switch back to Original Medicare and enroll in a stand-alone prescription drug plan. What should you tell her?
a. During the MA Open Enrollment Period, from January 1 – March 31, she may disenroll from the MA-PD plan into Original Medicare and also may add a stand-alone prescription drug plan. Correct
 
Mrs. Young is currently enrolled in Original Medicare (Parts A and B), but she has been working with Agent Neil Adams in the selection of a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan. It is mid-September, and Mrs. Young is going on vacation. Agent Adams is considering suggesting that he and Mrs. Young complete the application together before she leaves. He will then submit the paper application prior the start of the annual enrollment period (AEP). What would you say If you were advising Agent Adams?
b. This is a bad idea. Agents are generally prohibited from soliciting or accepting an enrollment form prior to the start of the AEP. Correct
 
Ms. Gonzales decided to remain in Original Medicare (Parts A and B) and Part D during the Annual Enrollment Period (AEP). At the beginning of January, her neighbor told her about the Medicare Advantage (MA) plan he selected. He also told her there was an open enrollment period that she might be able to use to enroll in a MA plan. Ms. Gonzales comes to you for advice shortly after speaking to her neighbor. What should you tell her?
d. There is a MA Open Enrollment Period (OEP) that takes place between January 1 and March 31, but Ms. Gonzales cannot use it because eligibility to use the OEP is available only to MA enrollees. Correct
 
Mrs. Schmidt is moving and a friend told her she might qualify for a “Special Election Period” to enroll in a new Medicare Advantage plan. She contacted you to ask what a Special Election Period is. What could you tell her?
a. It is a time period, outside of the Annual Election Period, when a Medicare beneficiary can select a new or different Medicare Advantage and/or Part D prescription drug plan. Typically the Special Election Period is beneficiary specific and results from events, such as when the beneficiary moves outside of the service area. Correct
 
Mr. Garcia was told he qualifies for a Special Election Period (SEP), but he lost the paper that explains what he could do during the SEP. What can you tell him?
a. If the SEP is for MA coverage, he will generally have one opportunity to change his MA coverage. Correct
 
Mr. Wendt suffers from diabetes which has gotten progressively worse during the last year. He is currently enrolled in Original Medicare (Parts A and B) and a Part D prescription drug plan and did not enroll in a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan during the last annual open enrollment period (AEP) which has just closed. Mr. Wendt has heard that there are certain MA plans that might provide him with more specialized coverage for his diabetes and wants to know if he must wait until the next annual open enrollment period (AEP) before enrolling in such a plan. What should you tell him?
d. If there is a special needs plan (SNP) in Mr. Wendt’s area that specializes in caring for individuals with diabetes, he may enroll in the SNP at any time under a special enrollment period (SEP). Correct
 
Which of the following individuals are likely to qualify for a special enrollment period (SEP) for both MA and Part D due to a change of residence? I. Edward (enrolled in MA and Part D) moves to a new home within the same neighborhood in his existing plan’s service area. II. Fiona (enrolled in MA and Part D) moves cross-country to an area outside her existing plan’s service area. III. Gilbert moves into a plan service area where there is now a Part D plan available to him from a service area where no Part D plan was available. IV. Henry makes a permanent move providing him with new MA and Part D options.
c. II, III, and IV only Correct
 
Mr. Rockwell, age 67, is enrolled in Medicare Part A, but because he continues to work and is covered by an employer health plan, he has not enrolled in Part B or Part D. He receives a notice on June 1 that his employer is cutting back on prescription drug benefits and that as of July 1 his coverage will no longer be creditable. He has come to you for advice. What advice would you give Mr. Rockwell about special enrollment periods (SEPs)?
d. Mr. Rockwell is eligible for a SEP due to his involuntary loss of creditable drug coverage; the SEP begins in June and ends September 1 – two months after the loss of creditable coverage. Correct
 
Ms. Lee is enrolled in an MA-PD plan, but will be moving out of the plan’s service area next month. She is worried that she will not be able to enroll in another plan available in her new residence until the Annual Election Period. What should you tell her?
c. She is eligible for a Special Election Period that begins either the month before her permanent move, if the plan is notified in advance, or the month she provides notice of the move, and this period typically lasts an additional two months. Correct
 
Mr. Yoo’s employer has recently dropped comprehensive creditable prescription drug coverage that was offered to company retirees. The company told Mr. Yoo that, because he was affected by this change, he would qualify for a Special Election Period. Mr. Yoo contacted you to find out more about what this means. What can you tell him?
d. It means that he qualifies for a one-time opportunity to enroll into an MA-PD or Part D prescription drug plan. Correct
 
Mrs. Schneider has Original Medicare Parts A and B and has just qualified for her state’s Medicaid program, so the state is now paying her Part B premium. Will gaining eligibility for this program affect her ability to enroll in a Medicare Advantage or Medicare Prescription Drug plan?
a. Yes. Qualifying for this state program gives Mrs. Schneider access to a Special Election Period that allows her to make changes to her MA and/or Part D enrollment at any time. Correct
 
If Mr. Johannsen gains the Part D low-income subsidy, how does that affect his ability to enroll or disenroll in a Part D plan?
a. He can enroll in or disenroll from a Part D plan at any time and the subsidy will apply to the plan he chooses. Correct
 
Mrs. Ridgeway enrolled in Original Medicare and Medigap coverage following her retirements several years ago. Four months ago, Mrs. Ridgeway dropped her Medigap policy to enroll in a Medicare Advantage (MA) plan for the first time. Unfortunately, Mrs. Ridgeway has found that many of her providers are not in the MA plan’s network. She has come to you for advice? What should you tell her?
d. She qualifies for a special enrollment period (SEP) that will allow her to make a one-time election to return to Original Medicare and she also has a guaranteed eligibility period to rejoin her Medigap plan. Correct
 
Mr. Chen is enrolled in his employer’s group health plan and will be retiring soon. He would like to know his options since he has decided to drop his retiree coverage and is eligible for Medicare. What should you tell him?
d. Mr. Chen can disenroll from his employer-sponsored coverage to elect a Medicare Advantage or Part D plan within 2 months of his disenrollment, but he should revaluate if he really wants to drop his employer coverage. Correct
 
Mary Samuels recently suffered a stroke while visiting her daughter and grandchildren. As a result, Mary has been admitted to a rehabilitation hospital where she is expected to reside for several months. The rehabilitation hospital is located outside the geographic area served by her current Medicare Advantage (MA) plan. What options are available to Mary regarding her health plan coverage?
a. Mary may make an unlimited number of MA enrollment requests and may disenroll from her current MA plan. Correct
 
Mr. Roberts is enrolled in an MA plan. He recently suffered complications following hip replacement surgery. As a result, he has spent the last three months in Resthaven, a skilled nursing facility. Mr. Roberts is about to be discharged. What advice would you give him regarding his health coverage options?
b. His open enrollment period as an institutionalized individual will continue for two months after the month he moves out of the facility. Correct
 
Mrs. Lenard is enrolled in a Medicare Cost plan. Recently the cost plan announced its intention to end its cost contract and transition to a Medicare Advantage (MA) Mrs. Lenard received a letter indicating that unless she chooses another plan or opts out she will be automatically enrolled in the new Medicare Advantage plan operated by an organization affiliated with her cost plan. What does this mean?
d. If Mrs. Lenard wants to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan affiliated with her cost plan effective January 1, she should do nothing and she will be automatically enrolled. If she does not want to enroll in that MA plan, she should choose another plan or otherwise opt out of the automatic enrollment. Correct
 
You are completing a PFFS plan sale to Mr. West who is new to Medicare and prefers to be contacted by telephone. As you are finishing up, what should you tell him about next steps in the enrollment process?
c. You need to get Mr. West’s phone number and include it on the enrollment form because the plan must call him after you leave to ensure that he understood the nature of the PFFS plan he selected and to verify his intent to enroll. Correct
 
Mrs. Johnson calls to tell you she has not received her new plan ID card yet, but she needs to see a doctor. What can she expect to receive from the plan after the plan has received her enrollment form?
b. Evidence of plan membership, information on how to obtain services, and the effective date of coverage. Correct
 
Mrs. Reynolds just signed up for a Medicare Advantage plan on the second of the month. She is leaving for vacation in two weeks and wants to know if her new coverage will start before she leaves. What should you tell her?
a. Typically her coverage would begin on the first day of the next month, so she should not expect her coverage to begin before she leaves. Correct
 
You meet with Mrs. Wilson to complete her enrollment in a Medicare Advantage plan. You tell her that there will be an enrollment verification process to confirm that she is enrolled in the plan that she requested and understands the plan features and rules. What should Mrs. Wilson expect regarding the verification process?
c. Mrs. Wilson will be contacted by the plan sponsor within 15 calendar days of receipt of the enrollment request. Correct
 
Mrs. Burton is in an MA-PD plan and was disappointed in the service she received from her primary care physician because she was told she would have to wait five weeks to get an appointment when she was feeling ill. She called you to ask what she could do so she wouldn’t continue to have to put up with such poor access to care. What could you tell her?
a. She could file a grievance with her plan to complain about the lack of timeliness in getting an appointment. Correct
 
Mr. Barker had surgery recently and expected that he would have certain services and items covered by the plan with minimal out-of-pocket costs because his MA-PD coverage has been very good. However, when he received the bill, he was surprised to see large charges in excess of his maximum out-of-pocket limit that included a number of services and items he thought would be fully covered. He called you to ask what he could do? What could you tell him?
d. You can offer to review the plans appeal process to help him ask the plan to review the coverage decision. Correct
 
Mrs. Disraeli is enrolled in Original Medicare (Parts A and B) and a standalone Part D prescription drug plan. She has recently developed diabetes and has suffered from heart disease for several years. She has also recently learned that her area is served by a SNP for individuals suffering from such a combination of chronic diseases (C-SNP). Mrs. Disraeli is concerned however, that she will have few rights or protections if she enrolls in a C-SNP. How would you respond?
d. Enrollees in SNPs must have access to provider networks that include enough doctors, specialists, and hospitals to provide all covered services necessary to meet enrollee needs within reasonable travel time. Correct
 
Ms. O’Donnell learned about a new MA-PD plan that her neighbor suggested and that you represent. She plans to switch from her old MA HMO plan to the new MA-PD plan during the Annual Election Period. However, she wants to make sure she does not end up paying premiums for two plans. What can you tell her?
d. She only needs to enroll in the new MA-PD plan and she will automatically be disenrolled from her old MA plan. Correct
 
Mr. Fitzgerald is selling his home to permanently move into a retirement facility near his daughter in a neighboring state. He has a stand-alone prescription drug plan, and has learned it is not available where he is moving. He doesn’t know what he should do. What can you tell him?
a. Because he is moving outside of the service area, the plan must automatically disenroll him. He will have a special election period to select a new plan. Correct
 
Mr. Robinson was quite ill recently and forgot to pay his monthly premium for his MA-PD plan. He is worried that he will lose his coverage now when he needs it the most. He is certain his plan will disenroll him because that is what happened to a friend of his in a similar type of plan. What can you tell Mr. Robinson about his situation?
b. Plan sponsors have the option to disenroll members who do not pay their premiums, but they must first provide each member with a grace period of not less than 2 months. Correct
 
Mrs. Valentino is currently enrolled in a Medicare Cost plan. This plan is no longer meeting her needs, but it is now mid-year and past the annual election period (AEP). What would you say to Mrs. Valentino regarding her options?
b. Mrs. Valentino can submit a written request to Medicare to be disenrolled from the Cost plan and enroll in Original Medicare. Correct
 
If Mr. Johannsen gains the Part D low-income subsidy, how does that affect his ability to enroll or disenroll in a Part D plan?
b. He qualifies for a special enrollment period and can enroll in or disenroll from a Part D plan and the subsidy will apply to the plan he chooses. Correct

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