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AP Psychology Unit 3 Practice Test

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Psychology Unit 3 Test

1 Schizophrenia is most closely linked with excess receptor activity for the neurotransmitter

A) dopamine. B) epinephrine. C) acetylcholine. D) serotonin.

2. The nineteenth-century theory that bumps on the skull reveal a person’s abilities and traits is called

  • evolutionary psychology
  • behavior genetics
  • molecular biology
  • biological psychology
  • phrenology

3. Dendrites are branching extensions of

  • neurotransmitters
  • endorphins
  • neurons
  • myelin
  • endocrine glands

4. The function of dendrites is to

  • receive incoming signals from other neurons
  • release neurotransmitters into the spatial junctions between neurons
  • coordinate the activation of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems
  • control pain through the release of opiate-like chemicals into the brain
  • transmit signals to other neurons

5. An axon is

  • a cell that serves as the basic building block of the nervous system
  • a layer of fatty tissue that encases the fibers of many neurons
  • an antagonist that blocks neurotransmitter receptor sites
  • the extension of a neuron that carries messages away from the cell body
  • a junction between a sending and receiving neuron

6. The longest part of a neuron is likely to be the

  • dendrite
  • axon
  • cell body
  • synapse
  • myelin sheath

7. In transmitting sensory information to the brain, an electrical signal travels from the _______ of a single neuron.

  • cell body to the axon to the dendrites
  • dendrites to the axon to the cell body
  • axon to the cell body to the dendrites
  • dendrites to the cell body to the axon
  • axon to the dendrites to the cell body

8. The speed at which a neural impulse travels is increased when the axon is encased by a

  • sympathetic nerve
  • myelin sheath
  • endocrine gland
  • pituitary gland
  • sympathetic vesicle

9. The slowdown of neural communication in multiple sclerosis involves a degeneration of

  • thresholds
  • dendrites
  • endocrine gland
  • myelin sheath
  • pituitary gland

10. The axon of a resting neuron has gates that do not allow positive sodium ions to pass through the cell membrane. What is this characteristic called?

  • myelin sheath
  • threshold
  • selective permeability
  • action potential
  • parasympathetic nervous system

11. The minimum level of stimulation required to trigger a neural impulse is called the

  • reflex
  • threshold
  • synapse
  • action potential
  • refractory period

12. The spatial junctions where impulses are chemically transmitted from one neuron to another are called

  • neurotransmitters
  • neural networks
  • synapses
  • axons
  • thresholds

13. The chemical messengers released into the spatial junctions between neurons are called

  • hormones
  • neurotransmitters
  • synapses
  • sensory neurons
  • motor neurons

14. Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that travel across the

  • cell body
  • synaptic gap
  • axon
  • myelin sheath
  • threshold

15. Reuptake refers to the

  • movement of neurotransmitter molecules across a synaptic gap
  • release of hormones into the bloodstream
  • inflow of positively charged ions through an axon membrane
  • reabsorption of excess neurotransmitter molecules by a sending neuron
  • the ending of the refractory period

16. When the release of ACh is blocked, the result is

  • depression
  • muscular paralysis
  • aggression
  • schizophrenia
  • euphoria

17. Transferring messages from a motor neuron to a leg muscle requires the neurotransmitter known as

  • dopamine
  • epinephrine
  • acetylcholine
  • insulin
  • endorphin

18.  José has just played a long, bruising football game but feels little fatigue or discomfort. His lack of pain is most likely caused by the release of

  • glutamate
  • dopamine
  • acetylcholine
  • endorphins
  • insulin

19. Alzheimer’s disease is most closely linked to the deterioration of neurons that produce

  • dopamine
  • acetylcholine
  • epinephrine
  • endorphins
  • glutamate

20. An undersupply of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter known as ____ is linked to seizures

  • glutamate
  • GABA
  • serotonin
  • ACh
  • dopamine

21. Migraine headaches are most closely linked with an

  • oversupply of GABA
  • undersupply of serotonin
  • oversupply of glutamate
  • undersupply of acetylcholine
  • oversupply of norepinepherine

22. Psychoactive drugs interfere with normal neural transmission. Where does this interference take place?

  • axon
  • cell body
  • myelin sheath
  • synapse
  • hormones

23. What are the molecules that are similar enough to a neurotransmitter to bind to its receptor sites on a dendrite and mimic that neurotransmitter’s effects called?

  • agonists
  • antagonists
  • endorphins
  • endocrines
  • action potential

24. Which of the following are located exclusively within the brain and spinal cord?

  • sensory neurons
  • motor neurons
  • myelin sheath
  • interneurons
  • axons

25. The body’s speedy, electrochemical information system is called the

  • circulatory system
  • threshold
  • action potential
  • nervous system
  • endocrine system

26. The somatic nervous system is a component of the ______ nervous system

  • peripheral
  • autonomic
  • central
  • sympathetic
  • parasympathetic

27. While you are hiking in the mountains, a rattlesnake slithers across your trail. Which of the following triggers the “fight or flight” response, increasing your heart rate and blood pressure, as you run away?

  • somatic nervous system
  • sympathetic nervous system
  • motor cortex
  • limbic system
  • parasympathetic nervous system

28. A simple, automatic, inborn response to a sensory stimulus is called a

  • neural network
  • action potential
  • neurotransmitter
  • reflex
  • threshold

29. A football quarterback can simultaneously make calculations of receiver distances, player movements, and gravitational forces. This best illustrates the activity of multiple

  • endocrine glands
  • endorphin agonists
  • neural networks
  • endorphin antagonists
  • thresholds

30. The master gland of the endocrine system is the

  • thyroid gland
  • adrenal gland
  • pituitary gland
  • pancreas
  • hypothalamus

31. To identify which specific brain areas are most active during a particular mental task, researchers would be most likely to make use of an

  • fMRI
  • hemispherectomy
  • ACh agonist
  • brain lesion
  • MRI

32. Your life would be most immediately threatened if you suffered destruction of the

  • amygdala
  • hippocampus
  • angular gyrus
  • corpus callosum
  • medulla

33. Which of the following structures in the brainstem help coordinate movements and lies above the medulla?

  • reticular formation
  • hippocampus
  • pons
  • thalamus
  • hypothalamus

34. The medulla is to the control of ____ as the cerebellum is to the control of _____.

  • eating; sleeping
  • breathing; walking
  • emotion; motivation
  • memory; attention
  • hearing; seeing

35. The reticular formation is located in the

  • brainstem
  • limbic system
  • sensory cortex
  • motor cortex
  • cerebellum

36. Your ability to experience physical sensations is most likely to be disrupted by damage to your

  • corpus callosum
  • angular gyrus
  • hippocampus
  • amygdala
  • thalamus

37. Addictive drug cravings are likely to be associated with reward centers in the

  • thalamus
  • cerebellum
  • reticular formation
  • nucleus accumbens
  • angular gyrus

38. Which lobes of the brain receive the input that enables you to feel someone scratching your back?

  • parietal
  • temporal
  • occipital
  • frontal
  • cerebral

39. An area at the rear of the frontal lobes tat controls voluntary movements is called the

  • angular gyrus
  • hypothalamus
  • motor cortex
  • reticular formation
  • frontal association area

40. To trigger a person’s hand to make a fist, José Delgado stimulated the individual’s

  • motor cortex
  • hypothalamus
  • sensory cortex
  • reticular formation
  • limbic system

41. The association areas are located in the

  • spinal cord
  • brainstem
  • thalamus
  • limbic system
  • cerebral cortex

42. The process of anticipating that you will be punished for misbehaving takes place within the

  • limbic system
  • sensory cortex
  • reticular formation
  • association areas
  • sympathetic nervous system

43. In 1861, Paul Broca studied a stroke patient he called “Tan.” He was called this because as a result of brain damage, it was the only word he could pronounce. Based on Broca’s early work, which of the following brain regions is involved in speech production?

  • angular gyrus
  • left temporal lobe
  • sensory cortex
  • left frontal lobe
  • auditory cortex

44. Which brain area is primarily involved with controlling speech?

  • sensory cortex
  • angular gyrus
  • association areas
  • Broca’s area
  • hypothalamus

45. Which brain area is primarily involved with understanding and producing meaningful speech?

  • sensory cortex
  • angular gyrus
  • association areas
  • Wernicke’s area
  • hypothalamus

46. Physical exercise and exposure to stimulating environments are most likely to promote

  • phrenology
  • neurogenesis
  • hemispherectomy
  • reward deficiency syndrome
  • plasticity

47. Psychologist Michael Gazzaniga asked split-brain patients to stare at a dot as he flashed HE·ART on a screen. HE appeared in the left visual field, ART in the right. When asked, patients said they saw

  • HE
  • ART
  • HEART
  • EA
  • nothing. They were unable to complete the task.

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