You’re Allowed To Use A Cell Phone While Driving As Long As There Isn’t Any Oncoming Traffic

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You’re allowed to use a cell phone while driving as long as there isn’t any oncoming traffic.
a. True
b. False
Answer: False. You’re not allowed to use a cell phone while driving.

Explanation

False, you are never allowed to use your cell phone while driving.

It’s not unusual to see people using their cellphones while driving these days, but the hazards of this habit cannot be overstated. It is considered an unsafe practice that may result in a diversion while driving and injuries.

Many territories have banned the usage of phones while driving after numerous crashes occurred when drivers were making calls or texts, and many jurisdictions have established rules that prohibit the usage of portable mobile devices.

However, utilizing a hands-free device is acceptable in specific settings, despite the fact that several research has confirmed that it is not safer in any way. Only where the usage of cell phones by youngsters is concerned, some governments have imposed limitations.

The number of incidents of distracted driving has increased in the United States, which has led to automobile collisions. Cellphones have been identified as the primary reason for this issue.

Despite the fact that many people are aware of the dangers and devastating consequences involved, they nevertheless choose to take a chance rather than remain safe in crucial moments on the road.

Cellphones are now an inextricable part of everyone’s life, to the point that it might be difficult for some people to put them down even when they’re behind the wheel.

What do the numbers say about this potential threat?

According to the CDC, roughly 3.5 million people are injured and more than 4,000 fatalities occur each year as a result of cell phone use while driving. Teenagers are among those who are most frequently killed or wounded when they dial or receive a call on their smartphones behind the wheel.

According to the National Safety Council, 1.2 million of the vehicle accidents that occurred in 2013 were caused by drivers being on calls, while another 341,000 were texting behind the wheel. Families may benefit from recognizing and managing these hazards if they are aware of such figures.

The statistics illustrate that this behavior is becoming more widespread, posing risks to the driver’s and passengers’ safety. While driving, using a phone causes drivers’ brains to be more focused on that activity and less attentive on the road.

To add to that, factors such as a lack of driving skills and gross inexperience combine to create a deadly mix in which teenage drivers are involved. According to research done by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, teens themselves feel it is more beneficial to put their phones away while driving.

They claim they are able to pay better attention to the road, are at less risk of encountering a crash, and it also helps them stay on the right side of the law.

The responsibility for making it safe for teenagers to drive rests with their parents, not with them. Avoid calling your teen when you know he or she is driving as a parent. Instead, leave a message asking to be called before leaving a location and again after arriving at their destination. A teenager may be tempted to pick up the phone if it’s their

You may also change your teen’s phone’s default “Do Not Disturb” setting so that they are not distracted while driving. Phones with newer operating systems can recognize when someone is driving and send automated notifications that do not alert the driver. This may be useful as a safety net for your kids when they’re behind the wheel.

 

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